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Fox Insight

The future of Parkinson’s research is in powerful hands. Yours.

Fox Insight is an online clinical study where people with Parkinson’s disease and their loved ones share information that could transform the search for better treatments. You can help shape the future of Parkinson’s research — but it’s going to take all of us, working together. You in?

https://foxinsight.michaeljfox.org/

 


Be prepared for a hospital visit

No one wants to go to the hospital, but sometimes it is necessary.

Here are some ways to be prepared

Aware in care kit
To protect, prepare and empower people with Parkinson’s before, during and after a hospital visit, we developed the free Aware in Care kit with tools and information to share with hospital staff during a planned or emergency hospital visit.

Aware in Care kits can be requested from your local Parkinson’s Foundation Chapter or Center of Excellence. If you do not live in an area with a Chapter or center, you can order a kit online.

http://parkinson.org/Living-with-Parkinsons/Resources-and-Support/Patient-Safety-Kit

Vial of life

Everybody should have a Vial of Life form filled out. The Vial of Life is a smart way to have your medical information on hand just in case of an emergency. Seniors need this because of their constant medical changes and medications… It’s the right thing to do.

Put one in your wallet, in your glove compartment, and especially on your refrigerator door

Print a kit http://www.vialoflife.com/print-free-vial-kits/

Print a decal to put on your door and refrigerator http://www.vialoflife.com/print-free-vial-kits/


Dance Through Parkinson’s Testimonials

​​The​re are ​many reasons that I enjoy participating in the Dancing ​Through Parkinson’s program. ​Here is my list:

​The brain can be changed by doing new activities. Dancing requires concentration and coordination, which help​s my brain​ stay sharp​. My neurologist is very pleased with my stable condition and says to keep up the exercise, including D​TP. T​his is just as important as ​​my medications, in ​her opinion.

I enjoy meeting the other ​people with Parkinson’s. D​TP provides a support group atmosphere, even though that was not the original intention of the program.

Rachelle ​brings a sense of joy to the class by playing interesting music and making the class fun and exciting . Th​e class always ​leaves me feeling uplifted.

Jud Eson – Dance Participant


Dance for Parkinson’s was something I didn’t have much interest in, especially since I couldn’t dance before I was diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease (PD) 11 years ago.  Through the cajoling of friends, I hesitantly went perhaps a month after the classes had started.  I was amazed by the positive energy that the instructor exuded and the physical/emotional benefit was measurable.  The class benefits  those who have extreme limitations and to those who have been recently diagnosed.  Since Rachelle’s most recent training in NYC with the Mark Morris Dance Group, the class has seen a higher focus on fine motor skills, gait training, coordination, and balance exercises, which translates into real life benefits of dressing one’s self without help, walking, typing, thinking, and the general well being of individuals who have been inflicted by PD. Beyond the physical benefits, I spoken to a number of people in the class whereby Dance for PD is their only social outlet for the week.
While the class is being partially subsidized by the local PD support group, the weekly cost of $5 may seem at first glance as “affordable”, one must remember that generally speaking, PD patients are older and typically on a fixed income.  In my case, the impact of PD has forced me to stop working, and I too am now on a fixed income. It would be my hope that the making the Dance for PD class free would allow class size to grow with many of these PD dancers being able to experience the benefits of the Ciccotti Center.   Making the PD Dance class free would make it available to more PD patients.
While medical breakthroughs have been limited, exercise in any format has shown to slow down the progression of PD by as much as 30%.

Patrick Klee – Dance Participant


I would like to thank the Ciccotti Center for hosting this class! It is one of the activities I truly look forward to attending on a regular basis.
I was diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease (PD) almost 20 years ago. For me, the best thing is exercise… all different forms of exercise and movement. The variety for me is important.
Besides taking the Dance/Movement class I also take a (non-contact) boxing class and a spin class (stationary bike). The dance class to me is like a PD Support Group. We get together, chat, take the class, and then chat more. This is one of the few places I feel comfortable to make mistakes and not over think about my symptoms. We are a group of like individuals taking the class with
limited opportunities to have the camaraderie of others in public. This class gives that to us. The smiles, laughter, and joy that emit from the room can be amazing. I appreciate this opportunity to let you know how grateful I am of the Cicotti Center’s support.

Bruce Plotsky – Dance Participant


Channeling Dance to Keep Moving with Parkinson’s

“Seven years ago, I was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, for which there is still no cure. I had but two options, I could live in fear, or I could scare myself healthy. I scared myself healthy, and so can you.”

Exercise is an important part of healthy living for everyone. For people with Parkinson’s disease (PD), exercise is more than healthy — it is a vital component to maintaining balance, mobility and activities of daily living. Exercise and physical activity can improve many PD symptoms. These benefits are supported by research.

Read more


According to a study published in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience Journal, dancing, especially when followed by a change in choreography, is superior to repetitive physical activities such as walking or cycling.

People who are physically active can slow down their brain’s aging process. Neuroscientists behind this study say that dancing is the most effective physical activity.

In their study, they prove that 2 different types of physical activity, dancing and endurance training  both increase the brain’s area that declines over time as we age. But, only dancing has proved to be effective when it comes to changes in behavior due to the noticeable improvements in balance.
The researchers selected 52 elderly volunteers aged 63-80 years for the purpose of the study. Then, they divided them randomly into two groups, one group was assigned to join dance classes, and the other group joined the sports control group.
The dance group took dance lessons with a constant change of choreography which moves they were asked to memorize. The program for the sports group, on the other hand, consisted of strength training, endurance training, and flexibility training.
The hippocampus area of the brain which is the most susceptible to decline because of the aging processes has increased in both groups. This area of the brain is also responsible for memory, balance, as well as learning.
But, only volunteers in the dance group had an increased volume of other subparts in the left hippocampus. Moreover, only dancing had increased the volume of one part in the right hippocampus called the subiculum.
This study proved that dancing, especially when followed by a change in choreography, is indeed superior to repetitive physical activities such as walking or cycling.


More than 35 peer reviewed scientific research studies conducted at a number of major university research centers around the world including Roehampton University, University of Florida, Queensland University of Technology, York University and the University of Freiburg point to the benefits of dance for people with Parkinson’s. A number of leading neurologists and movement disorder specialists around the world include Dance for PD classes among a shortlist of recommended activities for their patients.


Do you have a testimonial to add?


December 26 Dance for PD cancelled

Our Tuesday December 26 Dance for PD class normally at 1:30 at the Ciccotti Center is canceled.

We are still on for December 19

We are still on for January 2

We. Are. Still on for every Tuesday at 1:30

Why are we canceling?

  • The Ciccotti Center is having a blood drive that day and need the room.
  • It is the day after Christmas and attendance will most likely be low.
  • Other rooms at the Ciccotti Center will be full for kids camp.

Cleveland InMotion

I wish we had something like this in Albany

InMotion, a nonprofit health and wellness resource center for those living with Parkinson’s disease, has been recognized around the country for its no-cost Parkinson’s disease support and outreach.

Rossi said InMotion offers various programs for those living with Parkinson’s, with classes that are specific to their symptoms and needs. It offers classes in cycling, yoga, tai chi, boxing, dance and a program called Better Every Day, which is a unique fitness program designed for those living with Parkinson’s disease

Read more..

https://www.clevelandjewishnews.com/features/health/inmotion-keeps-parkinson-s-community-moving/article_ab172f14-df63-11e7-923f-db5c9fa2e6cf.html


9 Ways to Manage Brain Fog

One of the most frustrating symptoms of living with a chronic illness is brain fog. There are medications to treat many symptoms of chronic diseases, but sadly there isn’t yet a pill that takes away brain fog. However, there are ways to deal with it so patients can minimize its effects and lead a normal life.

We’ve put together a list of 10 ways to help manage brain fog, with help from princessinthetower.orgnewlifeoutlook.com, and Web MD.

Read more 


December 9, 2017 Holiday Get Together

RSVP deadline – Friday December 1st

Please join the Capital District Parkinson’s Support Group for our
Annual  Holiday Get Together
When: Saturday December 9, 2017 1 – 4 PM
Where:  Beverwyck Senior Center (directions)

We will have holiday appetizers and desserts as well as fun activities, gift exchange and music.

Cost: $15 single and $25 for a couple.
If you would like to take part in the gift exchange, please bring a gift valued around $10 or less.

We would prefer that payment be sent prior to the event but payment can also be accepted on the day. You must  advise Ian Wing of your intent to attend and the number attending either by e-mail : iwing5082@hotmail.com or phone 518 794 0237..

Please RSVP by Friday December 1 with check payable to “CD Parkinson’s Support Group”

Mail your check to
Ian Wing
PO Box 360
East Chatham, NY  12060

Membership dues of $15 per family per year will also be collected at the party for those that wish to become official members. Membership is voluntary and is not required to attend this event or other meetings


Dance class brings joy, confidence to people with Parkinson’s

Video from WNYT Benita Zahn story about Parkinson’s Dance at Ciccotti Center

Click on photo to start video

http://wnyt.com/health/dance-c lass-for-people-with-parkinson s-disease-ciccotti-center- colonie-albany-county/4672954/

November 16, 2017 06:14 PM

COLONIE – Parkinson’s disease is a progressive brain disorder that causes loss of muscle control. It affects about a million Americans.

Increasingly, those affected are turning to dance as therapy.

About five months ago, a local dance teacher started a class for people with Parkinson’s. Then, she learned about “Dance for Parkinson’s,” a program that got its start in 2001 in Brooklyn and has gone global.

She was invited to take the training class. Now, there’s a whole lot of happy feet.

Once a week, a group of people living with Parkinson’s Disease toss care to the wind and give themselves over to music and motion. It’s the “Dance for Parkinson’s” class at the Ciccotti Center in Colonie.

As the disease slowly robs them of their ability to move, the dance moves work on balance and coordination, cognition and personal confidence.

“It is a very bright spot in the week. Just that dancing and having fun and throwing your arms around and stuff. So I like that a lot,” explained Patricia Clock, a Parkinson’s patient.

The class incorporates movement from modern, ballet, tap, folk and social dancing – along with yoga.

“My wife has been trying to get me to dance ever since we were married and I’m really a horrible dancer,” admitted Jud Eson.

He was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease five years ago. He and his wife, Nancy, learned about “Dance for Parkinson’s” a few years ago when they spent time in Brooklyn where the program was born. So they were thrilled when longtime dance teacher, Rachelle Smith-Stallman, who’d started a Parkinson’s dance class in June, embraced the concept, undergoing training from “Dance for Parkinson’s.” The training helped hone specific moves to share with her classes bringing the most benefit to participants.

“I get the whole body going. I certainly work every single muscle possible. I use a lot of rhythm,” explained Smith-Stallman. “It really gives spirit. It gives joy,” she noted.

That joy may be at the heart of the class. That and the sense of community, because too often, as the disease progresses, the world shrinks. Here, there are no boundaries.

“‘Cause exercise is the best medicine for Parkinson’s disease,” pointed out Eson.

The classes are held weekly at the Ciccotti Center. They cost $5 a class. Just call to register.


November 27, 2017 – From Surviving to Thriving: Transforming Your Caregiving Journey – seminar

Plan to attend this free special event for Caregivers

“From Surviving to Thriving: Transforming Your Caregiving Journey”

Is caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia taking a toll on your well-being? Learn practical strategies for making your caregiving journey easier and for taking better care of yourself along the way. It really is possible to thrive as a caregiver!

Monday, November 27

6:30 – 8:30 pm

Hearst Media Center

645 Albany-Shaker Road, Albany, Featuring: Amy S. D’Aprix, MSW, PhD, CPCADr.

Amy D’Aprix is a gerontological social worker who is an internationally renowned expert on lifestyle issues relating to caregiving, retirement, aging, and family dynamics. “Dr. Amy”, as she is affectionately known, uses her years of professional experience in working with and on behalf of older adults and their families to give down-to-earth, practical, and professional informed guidance and advice. In addition to her professional and academic experience, Dr. Amy spent a decade caring for her own parents. She has authored the book “From Surviving to Thriving: Transforming Your Caregiving Journey”, and co-recorded a CD with an accompanying workbook: “Building the Bonds of Friendship in Midlife and Beyond”. Reception and light refreshments immediately following the presentation.

This program is free, however, space is limited. Please reserve your seat by Friday, November 17, by calling (518) 238-4164.This program is sponsored by the Alzheimer’s Caregiver Support initiative which is supported by a grant from the New York State Department of Health. www.SPHP.com/ALZCARE


March 8, 2018 – CDPSG Suport Group Meeting Notice

Join the CDPSG Support Group for the monthly meeting.

The Capital District Parkinson’s Support Group meets at 7 PM the second Thursday of most months at the Beverwyck Senior Center located at Krumkill Road, Slingerlands, New York.  In January and February we meet in the afternoon of the second Saturday at 1:30.

When are our meetings?

Patients, spouses, siblings, medical professionals/students, friends, and caregivers are welcome to attend to learn more about Parkinson’s disease or obtain information.

 Topic :
Dr Jennifer Durphy will speak on anxiety and depression in PD

Dr. Jennifer Durphy joined the Movement Disorders Division at Albany  Medical Center in 2012. She completed her neurology residency training at Georgetown University in Washington, DC and went on to complete her fellowship training at Albany Medical Center under the guidance of Dr. Eric Molho. Her fellowship involved an in depth training in the diagnosis and management of the full range of common and rare movement disorders.

She brought this experience and her passion for patient care to the movement disorders clinic where she is accepting new patients with Parkinson’s disease, Hungtington’s disease, tremor, dystonia, restless legs syndrome and tics. She also sees patients one day per week at the Albany Medical Center multispecialty clinic in Malta.

Dr. Durphy’s special interests include the neurosurgical treatment of movement disorders, as well as botulinum toxin injections for dystonia. She explains:

 “The diseases treated in a movement disorders clinic are complex and chronic conditions. It is important to me to take the time to get to know each patient individually and to understand how their condition impacts their life. I use this information to guide me in coming up with the best possible treatment plan for each patient.” 


Depressed? Try this

SuperBetter increases resilience – the ability to stay strong, motivated and optimistic even in the face of difficult obstacles. Playing SuperBetter makes you more capable of getting through any tough situation—and more likely to achieve the goals that matter most to you. Proven results in just 10 minutes a day

https://www.superbetter.com/


Caregiver resources

Caregiver teleseminars a service of http://seniorservicesofalbany.com/

http://seniorservicesofalbany.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Caregiver-Teleseminars-Fall-2017-revised.pdf


Tools for Caregivers Day:
Resources You Can Use When a Senior Relies on You

SAVE THE DATE !
Tools for Caregivers
April 14, 2018
​(REGISTRATION OPENS IN MARCH)
http://www.capitalregioncaregiver.com/ToolsforCaregivers.html

Reference Guide

http://www.capitalregioncaregiver.com/Tools_for_Caregivers_Reference_Guide_2016.pdf


Albany Guardian Society Fall 2017 Catalog

The Albany Guardian Society 2017 Fall Institute semester offers programs in the following broad categories:
• Technology
• Health Education
• Caregiving
• Consumer Interest
• Housing
• Legal

http://www.albanyguardiansociety.org/fall17catalog.php


Albany County Department for Aging

Caregiver Support Programs
Caregiver support programs assist informal caregivers—spouses, adult children, other family members, friends and neighbors in their efforts to care for older persons who need help with everyday tasks.

The programs include services to assist the caregiver in their efforts through:

  • Information,
  • Assistance and Referral
  • Counseling and Support Groups
  • Caregiver Training
    Home Based Services*
  • Transportation*
  • Personal Emergency Response Systems*
  • Short term respite to relieve the caregiver through in-home care or social or medical day care or overnight care in a facility*

*These services require and In-home assessment to determine eligibility

http://www.albanycounty.com/Libraries/Department_for_Aging/CAREGIVER_RESOURCE_GUIDE-2014.sflb.ashx


6 Things You Should Say to Someone With Parkinson’s Disease

from

https://parkinsonsnewstoday.com/2017/10/25/things-say-someone-parkinsons-disease/

Finding out a friend, family member or co-worker has Parkinson’s disease is devastating, and despite our best intentions, we often say things that are offensive or hurtful. What the patient really wants to hear is that you’re there for them and thinking of them.

With that in mind, we’ve compiled a list of things you should say to a person who has been living with Parkinson’s disease:

1. “I’ll do that for you!”
The “that” could be anything that you know the patient would find helpful, from fetching groceries to giving them a ride to the hospital to cooking them dinner. Actions speak louder than words and even just one act of kindness can help them out immensely, especially if they’re feeling ill following a treatment session.

2. “What are you thinking about today?”
It can be difficult to judge what’s going through the mind of someone who’s living with Parkinson’s. They’ll have good days and bad days, so some days you can be their cheerleader, and on other days, a shoulder to cry on. Asking them what they’re thinking about opens the lines of communication, and could spark a conversation about upcoming treatment, how tired they are or maybe nothing to do with their illness, if they want to get their mind off the subject.

3. “What don’t you want to talk about?”
Your friend or loved one may be completely open about all aspects of their illness, or there could be some areas that they really don’t want to talk about. Respect this by asking what’s off limits. This way you’ll know that you’re not overstepping.

4. “Thinking about you!”
This can either be said verbally or via a text message, email or Facebook message. It’s short and simple and lets the person know that you’re thinking about them and are in their corner without probing them for information.

5. “So this happened to me.”
It’s OK to talk about yourself and share good news about your life with your friend or loved one, so if you got that promotion, your kid did well at school or you just bought a new car — tell them. You can also share the bad things as well, because they still care about your life.

6. Nothing at all
Sometimes words are not needed, particularly if you don’t know what to say. It’s better to give a hug, squeeze someone’s hand or simply listen


Support Parkinson’s Research Funding

Support Parkinson’s Research Funding.  In the coming days and weeks Congress will be determining funding levels for various agencies involved with #Parkinsons research.  Please take action to push for at least $36 billion for the National Institutes of Health, and $5 million for the Centers for Disease control so it can begin work implementing the National Neurological Conditions Surveillance System.

 

http://advocate.michaeljfox.org/mjff/app/write-a-letter?0&engagementId=392613


Albany Medical College recruiting patients for clinical trial of Milotinib

A promising therapy that may slow or stop Parkinson’s progression is moving forward. The Michael J. Fox Foundation (MJFF) announced plans to collaborate to assess the clinical use and development of cancer drug nilotinib. Among the partners’ goals: planning a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of nilotinib.

What has the research told us about nilotinib?
Two studies in pre-clinical PD models from 2013 and 2014 showed protective effects of nilotinib. And several other studies in pre-clinical PD models have shown protective effects of inhibiting c-Abl. This provided impetus for testing nilotinib in patients.

The trial results from a small, open-label (all knew they were getting the drug) trial of nilotinib in people with advanced Parkinson’s — included impact on spinal fluid measures of alpha-synuclein and imaging scans of dopamine function.

The drug was well tolerated, and participants reported improvements in motor skills and cognitive function. These are encouraging results; unfortunately, researchers know that the likelihood of placebo effect is high in any open-label Parkinson’s clinical study. Nonetheless, MJFF deems these findings supportive of continued, rigorous research in this area.

Should patients start taking nilotinib?
In short, no. We just don’t know enough yet.

 

To find out more about eligibility for the study, contact :

Albany Medical College
Recruiting
Albany, New York, United States, 12208
Contact: Darryl Collins    518-262-6651    collind@mail.amc.edu
Contact: Sharon Evans    518-262-6682    evanss@mail.amc.edu
Principal Investigator: Eric Molho, MD

Read more about the drug :

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03205488

https://scienceofparkinsons.com/tag/nilo-pd/

https://www.michaeljfox.org/foundation/grant-detail.php?grant_id=1562

 

 

 

 


How Does Dopamine Affect Parkinson’s Disease?

This educational video from Parkinson’s UK explains more about Parkinson’s disease. The film shares that the disease develops in the substantia nigra part of the brain when the cells begin to die. These cells produce dopamine and the loss of dopamine in the brain leads to issues with movement.

As the disease progresses and the brain has less and less dopamine, the symptoms of the disease become more apparent and the patient develops tremors, difficulty walking, and other issues with movement. Researchers are working on ways to stop or slow down the loss of these dopamine-producing cells so that Parkinson’s disease may be treated and ultimately cured.

first published in https://parkinsonsnewstoday.com/2017/10/16/how-dopamine-affect-parkinsons/


7 Ways to Self-Manage Your Parkinson’s Disease

1. Educate Yourself
The more you know about Parkinson’s disease, the more you can be prepared for what it has to throw at you.

2. Healthy Lifestyle
Try to stay as active as possible — walking, swimming and practicing yoga are great low-intensity exercises that you can take at your own pace.

3. Hobbies and Socializing
If you have hobbies then try to continue with them, or find new pastimes that will help take your mind off Parkinson’s disease and give you something else to focus on.

4. Complementary Therapies
Meditation, acupuncture, use of essential oils and reflexology are among the many therapies you may find useful.

5. Mobility Aids
Everyone is different, and people will find different aids more beneficial than others.

6. Keeping Your Independence
If you can dress and bathe yourself, prepare simple meals and do household tasks then continue to do so, even if it takes you twice as long.

7. Join a Support Group
See if there is a local support group in your area for people with Parkinson’s disease. If there isn’t, find an online group. You’ll be able to share your experiences with people who really understand what you’re going through and get tips and information that will help you in your everyday life.

Read more:

https://parkinsonsnewstoday.com/2017/10/11/ways-self-manage-parkinsons-disease/

 


Researchers discover neuronal targets that restore movement in Parkinson’s disease model

Researchers working in the lab of Carnegie Mellon University neuroscientist Aryn Gittis, have identified two groups of neurons that can be turned on and off to alleviate the movement-related symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. The activation of these cells in the basal ganglia relieves symptoms for much longer than current therapies, like deep brain stimulation and pharmaceuticals.

Read more

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-05-neuronal-movement-parkinson-disease.html


New Parkinson’s treatment described as potential ‘game-changer’

This potential breakthrough stems from a recent clinical trial led by neurologist and professor Thomas Foltynie in the United Kingdom. In the course of a 48-week period, Parkinson’s patients who received the drug exenatide retained more motor function than patients who received a placebo.
Read more http://www.mlive.com/news/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2017/09/parkinsons_specialists_gather.html

 

Exenatide: One step closer to joblessness!

http://journals.lww.com/neurotodayonline/blog/breakingnews/pages/post.aspx?PostID=642


Exercise Classes

 

Always consult your physician before beginning any exercise program. This general information is not intended to diagnose any medical condition or to replace your healthcare professional. Consult with your healthcare professional to design an appropriate exercise prescription. If you experience any pain or difficulty with these exercises, stop and consult your healthcare provider.


Dance Through Parkinson’s – Classes are every Tuesday from 1:30 to 3:00 PM at Rudy A. Ciccotti Recreation Center, 30 Aviation Road, Albany, NY 12205, (518) 867-8920 – $5.00 per class*

P4P-Pedaling for Parkinson’s –Saratoga YMCA no charge – Monday & Friday – phone (518) 583-9622

P4P-Duanesburg/Delanson YMCA – Monday’s and Thursday’s (518) 895-9500 member’s free, non-members $6.00.

P4P-Southern Saratoga (Clifton Park YMCA) – Monday, Wednesday, Friday- members free, non-members $5.00 – phone (518) 371-2139

PWR – Parkinson’s Wellness Recovery Class Thursdays 10:30 – 11:45 Cost $45 for 7 weeks – Clifton Park YMCA – 1 Wall Street, Clifton Park, NY 12065 – Phone (518) 371-2139 Contact the Y for more information

P4P-Glenville YMCA –  Monday, Tuesday, Thursday– Members free, non-members $5.00—phone (518) 399-8118

Neuromotor Wellness – Glenville YMCA – Monday’s 12 noon – 1:15 PM.

P4P-Troy YMCA – Monday, Wednesday, Friday – Members free, non-members $5.00– (518) 272-5900

P4P-Guilderland YMCA – Monday, Wednesday, Friday – Member’s Free, non-members $5.00-Contact Chris Wilson – (518) 456-3634 ext 1140 for more information

P4P- Bethlehem YMCA – Monday, Wednesday, Friday, Parkinson’s Wellness Class Thursdays 12 N -1:45 Cost $45 for 7 weeks –– Phone (518) 439-4394 Contact the Y for more information

Schott’s Boxing, 21 Vatrano Road, Albany, NY 12205 (518) 641-9064- Friday’s 10:00 AM -The cost is $10.00 for the initial visit which covers the cost of the hand wraps. Hope Soars is partnering with Schott’s and will pay most of the membership fee which will be determined based on class size. If you have any questions, please contact Mark Burek (518) 428-0056.

Rock Steady Boxing CNY, 209 Oswego Street #12, Liverpool, NY. Classes are Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.   Contact Jeannette Riley (315) 622-2332 for assessment appointment and more information. Check Website CNY.rsbaffiliate.com for class information.

Rock Steady Boxing (RSB) at the Centers at St. Camilus, 813 Fay Road, Syracuse, NY 13219, Classes are Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11:45 – 1:15. Call for information, (315) 488-2112

Rock Steady Boxing for Onondaga County is daily, call (315) 622-2332 for more information

Yoga Class- Honest Weight Coop, 100 Watervliet Avenue, Albany, NY, Thursday, Free for Parkinson’s Patients and their family/caregivers, for information call Instructor Tamara Cookingham (518) 495-3239 tamaracookingham@gmail.com


5 steps to loving exercise, or at least not hating it

How do you overcome an exercise aversion? Mercedes Carnethon, Ph.D., associate professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, has some tips to help you incorporate exercise into your life – and maybe even learn to like it.

Read more from the American Heart Association here

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/HealthyLiving/PhysicalActivity/GettingActive/5-Steps-to-Loving-Exercise-Or-At-Least-Not-Hating-It_UCM_445812_Article.jsp#mainContent


Immune system may mount an attack in Parkinson’s disease

A new study suggests that T cells, which help the body’s immune system recognize friend from foe, may play an important role in Parkinson’s disease (PD). The study, published in the journal Nature, was supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health.

Read More


Sit to Stand Technique For Parkinson’s Disease

This video demonstrates the “And-Up!” technique I developed for people living with Parkinson’s Disease. This technique, when learned and practices, will help many rise from a chair to a standing position without assistance and without using their arms. Enjoy but proceed with caution. Patrick can be reached at his website: SmartXPD.com or call 323-422-9794 Disclaimer: USE AT YOUR OWN RISK: Patrick LoSasso’s videos are for informational purposes only. Consult a physician before performing this or any exercise program. After consulting with your physician, it is your responsibility to evaluate your own medical and physical condition, and to independently determine whether to perform, use or adapt any of the information contained here. Any exercise program has an inherent risk of injury. By voluntarily undertaking any exercise displayed herein, you assume the risk of any resulting injury

 


February 10, 2018 – CDPSG Meeting Notice

Join the CDPSG Support Group for the monthly meeting.

The Capital District Parkinson’s Support Group meets at 7 PM the second Thursday of most months at the Beverwyck Senior Center located at Krumkill Road, Slingerlands, New York.  In January and February we meet in the afternoon of the second Saturday at 1:30.

When are our meetings?

Patients, spouses, siblings, medical professionals/students, friends, and caregivers are welcome to attend to learn more about Parkinson’s disease or obtain information.

 Topic : Steve Hovey – Davis Phinney Foundation Ambassador, will speak about :
A wellness approach to dealing with Parkinson’s – exercise, diet, sleep, mindfulness.
Attitude – staying positive

Steve was diagnosed with Parkinson’s in 2007 at the age of 50. At the time of diagnosis, Steve did not know anyone with Parkinson’s, so he and his wife Nancy took it upon themselves to learn as much as they could about Parkinson’s symptoms and treatment. Their search soon led them to the Davis Phinney Foundation, where they learned about the importance of exercise and a healthy lifestyle, something Steve credits as significantly impacting the quality of life he continues to enjoy.

Now semi-retired, Steve continues to work part-time as a business consultant and is looking forward to sharing the message that “there are things we can do to manage our disease” as an ambassador for the Davis Phinney Foundation. “When I was diagnosed, the focus of the treatment was on medicine. The doctors never mentioned the benefits of dealing with the disease on a more holistic level – exercise, good nutrition and a healthy lifestyle,” Steve says. “Though [things are] getting better, there are still too many people who need to hear this message.”

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January 13, 2018 – Meeting notice

January 13, 2018

Join the CDPSG Support Group for the monthly meeting.

The Capital District Parkinson’s Support Group meets at 7 PM the second Thursday of most months at the Beverwyck Senior Center located at Krumkill Road, Slingerlands, New York.  In January and February we meet in the afternoon of the second Saturday at 1:30.

When are our meetings?

Patients, spouses, siblings, medical professionals/students, friends, and caregivers are welcome to attend to learn more about Parkinson’s disease or obtain information.

 Topic : Rachelle Smith-Stallman, Dance Through Parkinson’s instructor will talk about (and maybe do some of) our dance class

Book – John Grisham  THE TUMOR – free kindle book

John Grisham says THE TUMOR is the most important book he has ever written. In this short book, he provides readers with a fictional account of how a real, new medical technology could revolutionize the future of medicine by curing with sound.

THE TUMOR follows the present day experience of the fictional patient Paul, an otherwise healthy 35-year-old father who is diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor. Grisham takes readers through a detailed account of Paul’s treatment and his family’s experience that doesn’t end as we would hope. Grisham then explores an alternate future, where Paul is diagnosed with the same brain tumor at the same age, but in the year 2025, when a treatment called focused ultrasound is able to extend his life expectancy.

Focused ultrasound has the potential to treat not just brain tumors, but many other disorders, including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, hypertension, and prostate, breast and pancreatic cancer.
For more information or to order a free hard copy of the book, you can visit The Focused Ultrasound Foundation’s website. Here you will find a video of Grisham on the TEDx stage with the Foundation’s chairman and a Parkinson’s patient who brings the audience to its feet sharing her incredible story of a focused ultrasound “miracle.”
Readers will get a taste of the narrative they expect from Grisham, but this short book will also educate and inspire people to be hopeful about the future of medical innovation.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01AUYDNI6


October 21, 2017 – Hope Soars Gala


Please join us on

Saturday, October 21, 2017 from 6 – 11 for the Hope Soars Gala

at the Franklin Terrace Ballroom

126 Campbell Ave, Troy, NY 12180

The gala will benefit the Christine DiNapoli Parkinson’s Research Fund at Albany Medical Center.

Our fifth annual gala will feature Trishna Begam from News10 ABC as our Master of Ceremonies, a fabulous menu, a silent auction and live entertainment by TS Ensemble. ​​

We look forward to seeing you at the Gala


Register and pay online at the http://www.hopesoars.org/ Hope Soars site

TO PAY BY CHECK,  click  here, print the form and mail to

HOPE SOARS
1410 Maple Hill Road,
Castleton NY 12033.

Make checks payable to Hope Soars

 

 


October 21, 2017 – YOPD Support Group meeting

DATE: MONDAY, October 21, 2017
TIME: 2:00 PM
LOCATION: Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, 510 Albany Shaker Road, Loudonville

Join the YOPD Support Group  for the monthly meeting.

Patients (any age) and caregivers are welcome to attend to learn more about Parkinson’s
disease.

For further information regarding the YOPD, contact:
518-783- 3492 OR 518-371- 0448, after 3:00 p.m.

Mission: The YOPD support group shall welcome everyone with Parkinson’s disease including their care network. YOPD will support, share, and encourage PD persons to enjoy quality of life and ensure they are not alone in their journey. Information/issues obtained by YOPD from attendees will be treated confidentially and privacy respected.


September 25, 2017 – YOPD Support Group meeting at Route 7 Diner

DATE: MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2017
TIME: 7:00 PM
LOCATION: ROUTE SEVEN DINER, 1090 TROY SCHENECTADY ROAD
LATHAM, NEW YORK (Handicapped Accessible; Ample Parking)

Join the YOPD Support Group September 25, 2017 for the monthly meeting.
Dinner is ordered off the menu (individual bills). Reservations are not required.
Patients (any age) and caregivers are welcome to attend to learn more about Parkinson’s
disease in an informal setting.

For further information regarding the YOPD, contact:
518-783- 3492 OR 518-371- 0448, after 3:00 p.m.
Next Meeting: October 21, 2017

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, 510 Albany Shaker Road, Loudonville
Mission: The YOPD support group shall welcome everyone with Parkinson’s disease including their care
network. YOPD will support, share, and encourage PD persons to enjoy quality of life and ensure they are not
alone in their journey. Information/issues obtained by YOPD from attendees will be treated confidentially and
privacy respected.


About us

The Capital District Parkinson’s Support Group meets at 7 PM the second Thursday of most months at the Beverwyck Senior Center located at Krumkill Road, Slingerlands, New York.

 

Subscribe to our email list to receive reminders and announcements

Join our Facebook group

Serving the people with Parkinson’s, their families and caregivers in Albany, NY and throughout New York’s Capital Region.

Our mission is:

  • To provide moral support and fellowship to people with Parkinson’s Disease, their families and caregivers.
  • To raise awareness and disseminate information regarding Parkinson’s Disease
  • To act as a resource center for members and others who would like to know more about Parkinson’s.

We welcome new members – Please join us

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Parkinson’s symptoms reversed in monkeys by groundbreaking new treatment – Researchers hope to move to clinical trials in 2018

Scientists have successfully used “reprogrammed” stem cells to restore functioning brain cells in monkeys, raising hopes the technique could be used in future to help patients with Parkinson’s disease.

Read more

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/human-stem-cells-fight-parkinson-rsquo-s-disease-in-monkeys/
Trial raises Parkinson’s therapy hope

BBC News

Scientists have restored nerve cells destroyed by a condition similar to Parkinson’s disease, in monkeys. The Japanese team hope their work could lead to stem cell trials in human patients before the end of 2018.
http://www.bbc.com/news/health-41099870

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/parkinsons-disease-breakthrough-reverses-symptoms-monkeys-stem-cells-japan-kyoto-a7920816.html

 

 

 


U of Rochester offering PD care via telemedicine

DCNY is a research team sponsored by the University of Rochester and opened to all New Yorkers who have Parkinson’s Disease. PDCNY is offering 250 Parkies who qualify FREE PD care for the next 2 years. And, more importantly, the care will be delivered by a team of specialist, headed by a Movement Disorder Specialist.  A MDS is a Neurologist who took extra training to treat PD.  For the most part the care will be given in the patient’s home via the internet using Telemedicine.

See a flyer about the research here —> PDCNY Flyer Sep 1

Learn more and sign up at PDCNY.org. Or call 844-777-3269

 

Studies have shown that telemedicine care is just as good as care received at an academic medical center; in fact, many people have reported preferring telemedicine because they feel more at ease in the comfort of their own home.

Telemedicine is especially valuable to patients in remote, rural and underserved areas because it gives them the ability to consult specialists they’d otherwise have to travel hours to see.

http://www.parkinson.org/expert-care-research/telemedicine-virtual-care

 

Using web-based video conferencing to provide specialty care at home is feasible, provides patients value, and may offer similar clinical benefit to in-person care. Larger studies are needed to determine whether the clinical benefits are indeed comparable to in-person care and whether the results observed are generalizable.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3791511/


16 Tips to Increase Your Mobility Confidence While Living With Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s disease affects movement, coordination and mobility and as the disease progresses, it can often begin to ebb away at the confidence a person living with the condition has in their own abilities. However, all is not lost and there are ways that you can improve your confidence in movement. Although it may seem counterintuitive, according to the National Parkinson Foundation, in order to increase your mobility confidence you need to move more.

Here are a few of their tips to help you move more:

  • Try to increase the amount of physical activity you do each day. Tackling chores around the house and garden is a good way to get moving.
  • Attend a local exercise class — yoga, swimming, water aerobics, abd boxing classes are all excellent choices.
  • Try to move around more — get up and walk around the house every hour or get up while the commercials are on while watching TV.
  • Dance. Play some of your favorite music and dance around the house.

If mobility and balance become an issue, mobility aids such as canes and walkers will help you to get around and get some of your independence back.

  • Laser canes and walkers can help those who suffer from gait freezing. The laser can help guide where to place your feet.
  • Straight canes with a rubber tip are best for stability.
  • Ensure the cane is at the correct height for maximum support and has a hand grip that’s comfortable.
  • Tripod or quad canes are more difficult for people living with Parkinson’s disease to use than single tip canes.
  • Walkers with four or more wheels will offer better stability and allow for easier turning.
  • Other features such as swivel casters, larger wheels and hand brakes will offer the best stability.
  • Walkers with added baskets or seats can prove very useful for resting and carrying items.
  • Walkers which need to be lifted into place do not offer stability for anyone with Parkinson’s disease and can make them lose balance.

If your Parkinson’s disease is more advanced and you require a wheelchair, there are some considerations you should take into account:

  • Speak with your occupational therapist or physical therapist about the best type of wheelchair to suit your needs
  • Check with your insurance company to see if a wheelchair will be covered.
  • Opt for a lighter wheelchair that will be easier to move around.
  • A wheelchair with a reclining back will allow you to rest easier and help if you have elevated blood pressure

read more https://parkinsonsnewstoday.com/2017/08/30/tips-increase-mobility-confidence-living-parkinsons-disease/