Stress


How can I cope with stress?

It is not uncommon for the stresses of daily life — feeling overwhelmed, under prepared and over stimulated — to bring about anxiety and unrest. These psychological issues can be very important to your health, and even exacerbate the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. That is why it is so important to take a good look at what may be causing stress in your life and learn how to deal with the situations that give rise to anxiety.

Reducing stressors in life is not always easy. You might need to take a closer look at your life to find what needs to change. Sometimes just reducing the negative influences in your life can make a big difference. Here is what I do to reduce stress and overcome anxiety — and what you can try, too.

Turn off the news.  Overexposure to events that are beyond your control can create tension and worry.

Eliminate violent and mindless TV and stressful video games. Use that time to engage in a hobby or something you enjoy.

Minimize exposure to negative people. Instead, connect with people who uplift you.

Learn some relaxation techniques. Meditation, yoga and deep breathing can help restore a sense of calm. Seek a yoga class tailored to Parkinson’s patients.

Seek solace in music. Try classical, soft rock, nature sounds or alternative. Set up a comfortable listening area where you can fully enjoy the moment.

Stay passionate. If Parkinson’s takes something you love away or care about, find a hobby to replace it. If you can no longer paint, pick up a camera and take pictures or learn to sing.

Stay open-minded and resilient. This will help you handle adversity.

Exercise away the anxiety. Talk to your doctor or physical therapist about setting up an exercise regimen that meets your health needs.

Socialize.  Nothing can empower you like a feeling of camaraderie. Get involved with a community organization, a support group, or a charity that you believe in.

Learn to laugh. Keeping a sense of humor is a sure way to beat anxiety. Watch a funny video and read something that makes you laugh every day.

Remember, anxiety and depression often go together. But the symptoms of anxiety can include: feelings of panic, fear and restlessness, sleep disturbance, poor concentration, palpitations, shortness of breath, irritability, and dizziness.

If you feel that you are totally overwhelmed by your feelings, consult with your physician. He or she can refer you to a mental health professional. There is no shame in seeking help, when you need it. Everyone deals with his or her anxiety differently.

Read more

http://www.parkinson.org/understanding-parkinsons/newly-diagnosed/coping-with-anxiety