Exercise


A swell of research is showing how dance can benefit Parkinson’s sufferers

To dance is human; people of all ages and levels of motor ability express movements in response to music.

Professional dancers exert a great deal of creativity and energy toward developing their skills and different styles of dance.

How dancers move in beautiful and sometimes unexpected ways can delight, and the synchrony between dancers moving together can be entrancing.

To us as a neuroscientist and biomechanist (Lena), and a rehabilitation scientist and dancer (Madeleine), understanding the complexities of motor skill in a ballet move, or the physical language of coordination in partner dance, is an inspiring and daunting challenge.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4686924/TANGO-stave-effects-Parkinson-s-disease.html


LSVT BIG – what is it?

Recently principles of LSVT LOUD® were applied to limb movement in people with Parkinson disease (LSVT BIG®) and have been documented to be effective in the short term. Specifically, training increased amplitude of limb and body movement (Bigness) in people with Parkinson disease has documented improvements in amplitude (trunk rotation/gait) that generalized to improved speed (upper/lower limbs), balance, and quality of life. In addition, people were able to maintain these improvements when challenged with a dual task.

LSVT BIG can be delivered by a physical or occupational therapist. Treatment is administered in 16 sessions over a single month (four individual 60 minute sessions per week). This protocol was developed specifically to address the unique movement impairments for people with Parkinson disease. The protocol is both intensive and complex, with many repetitions of core movements that are used in daily living. This type of practice is necessary to optimize learning and carryover of your better movement into everyday life!

Start exercising NOW – as soon as possible. Physicians rarely refer their patients to health and fitness programs at diagnosis because medications are very effective early on at alleviating most of the symptoms, and patients experience little change in function. Yet, according to a recent survey it is at the time of diagnosis that patients often begin to consider lifestyle changes and seek education about conventional and complementary/alternative treatment options. Thus referrals to exercise, wellness programs and physical/occupational therapy would be best initiated at diagnosis, when it may have the most impact on quality of life.

Read more


Exercise Classes

Dance Through Parkinson’s – Classes are every Tuesday from 1:30 to 3:00 PM at Rudy A. Ciccotti Recreation Center, 30 Aviation Road, Albany, NY 12205, (518) 867-8920 – $5.00 per class***

P4P Pedaling for Parkinson’s – Saratoga YMCA no charge – Monday & Friday – phone (518) 583-9622

P4P – Duanesburg/Delanson YMCA – Monday’s and Thursday’s (518) 895-9500 member’s free, non-members $6.00.

P4P – Southern Saratoga (Clifton Park YMCA) – Monday, Wednesday, Friday- members free, non-members $5.00 – phone (518) 371-2139

PWR – Parkinson’s Wellness Recovery Class Thursdays 10:30 – 11:45 Cost $45 for 7 weeks – Clifton Park YMCA – 1 Wall Street, Clifton Park, NY 12065 – Phone (518) 371-2139 Contact the Y for more information

P4P – Glenville YMCA – Monday, Tuesday, Thursday– Members free, non-members $5.00—phone (518) 399-8118

Neuromotor Wellness – Glenville YMCA – Monday’s 12 noon – 1:15 PM.

P4P – Troy YMCA – Monday, Wednesday, Friday – Members free, non-members $5.00– (518) 272-5900

P4P – Guilderland YMCA – Monday, Wednesday, Friday – Member’s Free, non-members $5.00-Contact Chris Wilson – (518) 456-3634 ext 1140 for more information

P4P– Bethlehem YMCA – Monday, Wednesday, Friday, Parkinson’s Wellness Class Thursdays 12 N -1:45 Cost $45 for 7 weeks –– Phone (518) 439-4394 Contact the Y for more information

Schott’s Boxing, 21 Vatrano Road, Albany, NY 12205 (518) 641-9064- Friday’s 10:00 AM -The cost is $10.00 for the initial visit which covers the cost of the hand wraps.  If you have any questions, please contact Mark Burek (518) 428-0056.

Rock Steady Boxing Oswego, 209 Oswego Street #12, Liverpool, NY. Classes are Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.   Contact Jeannette Riley (315) 622-2332 for assessment appointment and more information. Check Website CNY.rsbaffiliate.com for class information.

Rock Steady Boxing Syracuse at the Centers at St. Camilus, 813 Fay Road, Syracuse, NY 13219, Classes are Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11:45 – 1:15. Call for information, (315) 488-2112

Yoga Class- Thursday Honest Weight Coop, 100 Watervliet Avenue, Albany, NY, Free for Parkinson’s Patients and their family/caregivers, for information call Instructor Tamara Cookingham (518) 495-3239 tamaracookingham@gmail.com

Free on-line exercise videos

Always consult your physician before beginning any exercise program. This general information is not intended to diagnose any medical condition or to replace your healthcare professional. Consult with your healthcare professional to design an appropriate exercise prescription. If you experience any pain or difficulty with these exercises, stop and consult your healthcare provider..


Building a Healthier You – Neuromotor Wellness – Class at the Glenville YMCA

The class will address muscle issues and, like the  “People with Parkinson’s” and  “Parkinson’s Wellness Recovery” classes, it will also work with balance, speech, manual dexterity, etc. It is open open to anyone with muscular degeneration challenges: Parkinson’s, MS, ALS, stroke recovery, muscle injury. 
Participants should be able to walk and stand unassisted. Participants must have a waiver and medical clearance. The cost will be $45 for Y members, $56 for Community members; free to caretakers.
For more information, you can call the Glenville YMCA, 399 – 8118,  127 Droms Rd, Glenville.

The class will be held on Mondays, from noon to 1:15.

The class will run through the summer of 2017

Please Note: There are still PWP and/or PWR classes going on at other YMCA’s.

  • Southern Saratoga County Y (Clifton Park) holds their class on Thursdays from 10:30 –  11:45.
  • Bethlehem Y is on Thursdays from noon – 1:15.
  • Troy Y’s class is held on Tuesdays from 10:30 – 11:45 – however, I did hear that they might suspend the class for the summer and start up again in the fall.
  • Troy’s class is taught by Sondra who actually works in the East Greenbush Y, so I assume East Greenbush also has a PWP class, but I don’t know when it is given or if it will be suspended for the summer either.
  • Other Y’s  may also give these classes, but I don’t have specific information, so if you are interested, please contact the Y nearest you and inquire! If they don’t have one, and enough people request it, they may have someone trained and start one! 

Wednesday, June 21, 2017 – Live from Brooklyn: Dance for PD

For those who haven’t tried the local Dance for PD class which is held weekly at the Ciccotti center off Wolf Rd, this will give you a taste of what the class is like.

Here is information about our local class. – CLASSES MEET EVERY TUESDAY FROM 1:30 TO 3:00 (no class on July 4th) at Rudy A. Ciccotti Family Recreation Center – 30 Aviation Road – Albany, 12205 – (518) 867-8920

Live from Brooklyn:

Dance for PD

Wednesday, June 21

2:15-3:30 PM (US Eastern Time)

Join us as we continue our season of live-streamed Dance for PD® classes from the Mark Morris Dance Center in Brooklyn, NY.

No registration required—just click below at the scheduled time.

Class taught by John Heginbotham | Music by William Wade

Can’t make it? Click here to enjoy archived classes.


Exercise resources

It is recommended that you exercise within 55 to 85 percent of your maximum heart rate for at least 20 to 30 minutes to get the best results from aerobic exercise. The MHR (roughly calculated as 220 minus your age) is the upper limit of what your cardiovascular system can handle during physical activity.

Target Heart Rate Calculator | ACTIVE


Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion Scale

One way to see how much progress you’re making in your physical activity is to measure the amount of effort it takes to do an activity. Over time, the amount of effort it takes should decrease. Once you’ve reached this point, you can gradually move on to more challenging activities.

The Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) scale will help you estimate how hard you’re working (your activity intensity). Perceived exertion is how hard you think your body is exercising. Ratings on this scale are related to heart rate (how hard your heart is working to move blood through your body).

How to Use the Scale

  • While you’re doing an activity, think about your overall feelings of physical stress, effort and fatigue. Don’t concern yourself with any single thing, like leg pain or shortness of breath. Try to concentrate on your total, inner feeling of exertion.
  • Find the best description of your level of effort from the examples on the right side of the table.
  • Find the number rating that matches that description. Add a zero to the end of the number rating to get an estimate of your heart rate during activity (also known as training or target heart rate).
  • Typically, RPE ratings for activity in the target heart rate zone will be between 12 and 16. The shaded areas are the moderate activity zones.
  • If your RPE for an activity decreases over time, you’ve improved your fitness level. Congratulations!

Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) Scale

Number Rating Verbal Rating Example
6 No effort at all. Sitting and doing nothing.
7 Very, very light Your effort is just noticeable.
8
9 Very light Walking slowly at your own pace.
10 Light effort.
11 Fairly light Still feels like you have enough energy to continue exercising.
12
13 Somewhat hard
14 Strong effort needed.
15 Hard
16 Very strong effort needed.
17 Very hard You can still go on but you really have to push yourself. It feels very heavy and you’re very tired.
18
19 Very, very hard For most people, this is the most strenuous exercise they have ever done. Almost maximal effort.
20 Absolute maximal effort (highest possible). Exhaustion.

Dance Through Parkinson’s Class

CLASSES MEET EVERY TUESDAY FROM 1:30 TO 3:00

at
Rudy A. Ciccotti Family Recreation Center

30 Aviation Road – Albany, 12205 – (518) 867-8920

Partners and caregivers welcome.

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12 Types of Exercise Suitable for Parkinson’s Disease Patients

If you have Parkinson’s disease, there are a lot of health benefits that come along with exercise. Staying active can help you sleep, strengthen your muscles and joints, reduce stress and depression, and improve posture, balance, and gait.

But what sort of exercise should you do? The types of exercise you choose will depend, to some degree, on the severity of your Parkinson’s disease and your overall health. According to the Parkinson’s Disease Clinic and Research Center at the University of California, the exercises should be varied and incorporate changing directions through unplanned movement, cardiovascular exercise, balance, strength training and rhythmical exercises.

How does Parkinson’s disease affect the brain?

Unplanned and Random Movement
The exercises listed require the person to change tempo and direction regularly. These will challenge a person mentally as well as physically as they require concentration to perform.

  • Walking, hiking or jogging
  • Racket sports such as badminton, table tennis, squash
  • Yoga or Tai Chi
  • Outdoor cycling
  • Dancing
  • Aerobic classes
  • Marching with swinging arms
  • Swimming in different strokes

Planned and Repeated Movement
These exercises are generally repeated movements that require balance. They can be performed while doing something that challenges a person mentally, such as watching a quiz show or the news, throwing and catching balls, singing, or problem-solving.

  • Cycling on a static bike
  • Weightlifting using light weights
  • Swimming laps in the same stroke
  • Slow walking on a treadmill

Read more 


Sunnyview’s Adaptive Recreation Experiences program

Introducing the 2017 Summer Adaptive Recreation Experiences … Sunnyview’s Adaptive Recreation Experiences program provides individuals with disabilities the opportunity to return to previously enjoyed activities or to try something new. Sessions are designed to encourage and assist each participant to have fun, and be successful on a variety of levels. All programs are open to those in wheelchairs, as well as ambulatory participants. Experiences are staffed by Sunnyview therapists, volunteers, and experts in that specific activity. Each activity offers a unique opportunity to try our adaptive equipment

More information on printable flyer here


Dancing Might Help Prevent Parkinson’s, Recent Research Points Out

Dancing helps prevent Parkinson’s disease, obesity, dementia, depression and anxiety, says Dr. Patricia Bragg, CEO of organic health company Bragg Live Food Products.“New studies show that dancing increases your memory and helps prevent a wide variety of diseases such as Alzheimer’s,” Bragg said in a press release.

Bragg’s father, Dr. Paul C. Bragg, was the originator of health stores in the United States, in 1912. For both father and daughter, dancing became a way of life.

Today, the 87-year-old Bragg sees herself as a crusader, born to carry on her father’s health movement, which pioneered many approaches that today would be considered “‘alternative medicine.”

“I have been dancing all of my life, and it’s not surprising to me that medical science is proving what I’ve known all along,” said Bragg.

Dancing has indeed been shown to help people with Parkinson’s recover balance and muscle control, as well as to help reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s dementia by 50 percent, which is expected to strike nearly 14 million Americans over the next 30 years.

“Think of the millions who can avoid this trauma simply by dancing,” said Bragg, the author of 10 best-selling “self-health” books.

According to a University of California Berkeley report, dancing has been shown to reduce depression, anxiety and stress and boost self-esteem. The New York Times also recently reported that dancing improves how the brain processes memory. Another study comparing the neurological effects of country dancing with those of walking and other activities suggested there might be something unique about social dancing.
In fact, dancing seems to increase cognitive acuity at all ages in a singular way, since they demand split-second decisions and exercise neuronal synapses. Dancing also helps keep the only neural connection to memory strong and efficient.
“My memories of dancing with Fred Astaire, Lawrence Welk, Arthur Murray and Gene Kelly are crystal-clear and so is my memory of the great time I had dancing last night,” said Bragg.


Knocking out Parkinson’s one punch at a time

Video of local boxing class

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — As many as 1 million people live with Parkinson’s disease in America. Now, a new exercise program is energizing patients diagnosed with the movement disorder and renewing hope among patients.


Parkinson’s Patients Could Dance Their Way to Better Health

A recent article in the Harvard Gazette suggests dance as a potential treatment for neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD).

Imaging studies have identified several brain regions involved in the complex, rhythmical, and coordinated movements that constitute dance. The motor cortex is — as with other kinds of voluntary movement — involved in planning, controlling, and executing dance moves.

Read more


Art Therapy and Parkinson’s Disease

Find Pleasure: Art making should be enjoyable. There is no such thing as a “wrong” mark. Every expression is valid.

Experience Control: Art making is an activity in which the artist can experience choice (through color, medium, line, etc.) and control over one’s environment.

Value Individuality: Free creation can encourage spontaneity which can, in turn, improve confidence.

Express Oneself: An experience of slowed speech or flat affect can limit one’s ability to communicate. Art is another language for communication which can be done at the artist’s own pace.

Relax: Art making has been proven to lower blood pressure, reduce perseverative thoughts, and lift depression. 

Improve Flow in Mind/Body Connection: In a relaxed state when focus is on the artistic expression rather than on the physical movement itself, motion can become more fluid. 

Promote Concentration, Memory, Executive Functions, Improve Hand-eye Coordination: Art making increases bilateral activity in the brain. When drawing, one uses both the right and left hemispheres of the brain. This is a wonderful way to take greater advantage of mental resources.

Read more


Exercise Can Be a Boon to People With Parkinson’s Disease – NY Times

“The earlier people begin exercising after a Parkinson’s diagnosis, and the higher the intensity of exercise they achieve, the better they are,” Marilyn Moffat, a physical therapist on the faculty of New York University, said. “Many different activities have been shown to be beneficial, including cycling, boxing, dancing and walking forward and backward on a treadmill. If someone doesn’t like one activity, there are others that can have equally good results.”

Read more


Chair Yoga at St. Sophia’s Tuesday

For seniors with mobility issues, there is a “Chair Yoga” class sponsored by NNORC which meets on Tuesday at 11 a.m. The instructors for all three classes are trained and dedicated professionals.

 

Monday morning Tai Chi class sponsored by Albany Senior Services which meets at 9:30 a.m.

At St. Sophia Greek Orthodox Church 440 Whitehall Road Albany, New York 12208
Tel: (518) 489-4442

(Note: There are no membership fees for this group.)

For health and fitness, there are programs that are free. A Monday morning Tai Chi class sponsored by Albany Senior Services which meets at 9:30 a.m.

 

http://stsophia.net/events/participate/


Tai Chi class at St. Sophia’s Monday

Monday morning Tai Chi class sponsored by Albany Senior Services which meets at 9:30 a.m.

At St. Sophia Greek Orthodox Church 440 Whitehall Road Albany, New York 12208
Tel: (518) 489-4442

(Note: There are no membership fees for this group.)

For health and fitness, there are programs that are free. A Monday morning Tai Chi class sponsored by Albany Senior Services which meets at 9:30 a.m.

And for seniors with mobility issues, there is a “Chair Yoga” class sponsored by NNORC which meets on Tuesday at 11 a.m. The instructors for all three classes are trained and dedicated professionals.

http://stsophia.net/events/participate/


The benefits of Tai Chi

It isn’t every day that an effective new treatment for some Parkinson’s disease symptoms comes along. Especially one that is safe, causes no adverse side effects, and may also benefit the rest of the body and the mind. That’s why I read with excitement and interest a report in the New England Journal of Medicine showing that tai chi may improve balance and prevent falls among people with Parkinson’s disease. Tai chi improves balance and motor control in Parkinson’s disease

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LSVT Loud and LSVT Big – voice and movement treatments

Recent advances in neuroscience have suggested that exercise-based behavioral treatments may improve function and possibly slow progression of motor symptoms in individuals with Parkinson disease (PD). The LSVT (Lee Silverman Voice Treatment) Programs for individuals with PD have been developed and researched over the past 20 years beginning with a focus on the speech motor system (LSVT LOUD) and more recently have been extended to address limb motor systems (LSVT BIG).

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Yoga classes for people with Parkinson’s disease

Thursdays 10:30 – 11:30 am Honest Weight Co-op 100 Watervliet Avenue, Albany NY

In our yoga classes for people with Parkinson’s disease, we will be working with breath, movement, thought, voice, and sound. Through creative use of these branches of yoga, we will seek ease and relief from common issues associated with PD.

Caregivers are welcome to participate. The approach will be gentle, yet motivating. We will practice using chairs, with some standing movements. Modifications will be offered for those that cannot stand or have other limitations. Sneakers and loose, comfortable clothing are recommended.

For more information, call Hope Soars 518.428.0056.

Come enjoy the flow of yoga in your body, mind, and spirit. Presented By Hope Soars and Albany Medical Center