Health and Wellness


Anxiety and depression

When facing a diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, it is understandable to feel anxious or depressed. But mood disorders such as anxiety and depression are real clinical symptoms of Parkinson’s, just as rigidity and tremor. In fact, at least half of all Parkinson’s patients may suffer from clinical depression at some point during the course of their disease, according to some estimates.

The good news: Over the past decade, researchers have placed increasing focus on investigating these aspects of the disease, and today we have a better understanding of how to treat mood disorders in Parkinson’s and increase quality of life.

Read more at https://www.michaeljfox.org/understanding-parkinsons/living-with-pd/topic.php?emotions-depression

 

Feeling worried is an understandable reaction to a Parkinson’s diagnosis. But when feelings of constant worry or nervousness go beyond what is understandable, a person may be experiencing anxiety, which is more serious.

Anxiety is a common nonmotor symptom of PD. It is important to note that anxiety is not simply a reaction to the diagnosis of Parkinson’s, but is instead a part of the disease itself, caused by changes in the chemistry of the brain. Estimates show that between 25 and 45 percent of people with PD experience an anxiety disorder at some point.

Read more at http://www.pdf.org/anxiety

There are two main types of treatment options for anxiety:  medications and psychological counseling (psychotherapy).  Depending on the severity of symptoms, psychotherapy can be used alone or combination with medication. NPF recommends a personalized, holistic and comprehensive strategy for the treatment of mental health problems, meaning that care should be tailored to each person’s individual health needs and preferences.

Read more at http://www.parkinson.org/understanding-parkinsons/non-motor-symptoms/anxiety/What-are-the-Treatment-Options-for-Anxiety

There are many different ways in which a person with Parkinson’s can experience anxiety. The following is a list of common anxiety disorders and a description of symptoms associated with each form. As many as two out of five people with Parkinson’s will experience one of these forms during the course of their illness.

Read more at http://www.parkinson.org/understanding-parkinsons/non-motor-symptoms/anxiety/What-are-the-Symptoms-of-Anxiety

Some people with Parkinson’s may experience anxiety including feelings of unease, worry and fear.

It is often a natural reaction to situations we find threatening or difficult. There are a number of ways of managing anxiety.

Read more at https://www.parkinsons.org.uk/information-and-support/anxiety

 


Sleep Disturbances – from PDF.org

read more at http://www.pdf.org/sleep_disturbance

Sleep Disturbances

Many people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) have trouble sleeping through the night.

In some cases, PD symptoms like rigidity or tremor keep people awake. The brain changes that are part of PD also can cause sleep difficulties, and some people have problems sleeping even before movement symptoms develop and PD is diagnosed. In addition, some PD medications can disrupt sleep at night, and others make people sleepy during the day.

A good night’s rest is essential to feeling well. Disrupted sleep can affect your health, mood and overall quality of life. Furthermore, when people with PD don’t sleep well, the sleep of their care partners is disrupted too. Care partners also need restful sleep to stay healthy.

Symptoms

Nighttime Sleep Difficulties

  • Difficulty going to sleep, because PD symptoms like rigidity make it hard to get comfortable or turn over.
  • Difficulty falling asleep due to symptoms of anxiety or depression.
  • Difficulty staying asleep, because of a need to use the bathroom during the night, the return of motor symptoms when medications wear off, pain or hot flashes with night sweats.
  • Noise produced by tremor against a pillow.
  • Vivid dreams or nightmares caused by levodopa medications.
  • Early morning awakening, from a too-early bedtime or associated with depressed mood.
  • An overwhelming urge to move or an unpleasant sensation in the legs caused by restless legs syndrome.
  • Loud snoring, restless sleep and pauses in breathing during the night caused by sleep apnea. Although sleep apnea is usually associated with being overweight, this is not the always the case for people with PD. As many as 40 percent of people with PD have sleep apnea.
  • Activity, sometimes violent movements such as kicking, punching, running or getting out of bed due to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder. People with REM sleep behavior disorder do not relax their muscles normally during sleep, and thus act out violent dreams. This affects about a third of men with PD, but is less frequent in women with PD.
  • Disruption in the normal sleep-wake cycle caused by excessive sleepiness during the day or taking long naps during the day.

Troublesome Daytime Sleepiness

  • Excessive sleepiness during the day may be a symptom of PD and may even start before the characteristic movement symptoms appear.
  • Many PD medications can cause sleepiness during the day and may even cause sudden sleepiness with potentially dire consequences, such as falling asleep while driving.
  • Too much napping during the day makes it hard to sleep through the night.

Therapies

Good sleep is a foundation for good health. Not only does it contribute to tiredness and fatigue, it can also worsen any cognitive issues you are experiencing. If you have trouble sleeping, remember that you don’t have to “just live with it.” Medical therapies can help some sleep difficulties:

  • A long-acting levodopa medication might prevent PD symptoms from returning during the night. Talk to your doctor about adjusting your PD medications to maximize wakefulness during the day and sleep at night, while controlling your symptoms.
  • For REM sleep behavior disorder, doctors may prescribe melatonin or clonazepam (Klonopin®), which is a long-acting sedative.
  • For sleep apnea, wearing a CPAP device (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure device) at night can help prevent obstruction of the airways. You need to have an overnight sleep evaluation for a sleep apnea diagnosis to be made.
  • Talk to your doctor about over-the-counter sleep aids, such as melatonin, as well as those available with a prescription. It is important to balance the benefits of sleep medications with the risks, especially of daytime sleepiness, cognitive decline and increased falls.
  • Antidepressants are sometimes prescribed to help nighttime sleep.
  • If urinary frequency keeps you up at night, be sure your doctor rules out causes other than PD. In addition, there are several medications that can be helpful, including oxybutynin (Ditropan®), tolterodine (Detrol®), trospium (Sanctura®), solifenacin succinate (VESIcare®), darifenacin (Enablex®), mirabegron (Myrbetriq®) and fesoterodine fumarate (Toviaz®). If your doctor has difficulty managing bladder symptoms, you may be referred to a bladder specialist (urologist).
  • Some physicians prescribe stimulants to help people with PD stay awake during the day.

Tips for Better Sleep

People with PD — and their care partners too — can take these steps to get to sleep faster and stay asleep:

  • Keep a regular sleep schedule — go to bed at the same time each night and get up at the same time each morning.
  • Choose your bedtime based on when you want to get up and plan to spend seven to eight hours a night in bed.
  • Make a bedtime routine — for example, snack, bath, tooth-brushing, toileting — and follow it every evening.
  • Spend time outdoors and exercise every day, in the morning if possible. Avoid exercise after 8:00 PM.
  • If you can’t get outdoors, consider light therapy — sitting or working near a light therapy box, available at drug stores and department stores.
  • If you nap, try to do so at the same time every day, for no more than an hour, and not after 3:00 pm.
  • Avoid stimulants like caffeine, nicotine and alcohol, especially six hours before bedtime. While alcohol can initially cause sleepiness, it actually disrupts sleep.
  • Avoid heavy meals in the evening.
  • If you take PD medications at night, keep your dose and a glass of water close by so you don’t have to get up in the middle of the night.
  • Sleep in a cool dark place and use the bed only for sleeping and sexual activity. Do not read or watch television in bed.
  • Avoid “screen time” — television, phones, tablets such as your iPAD — one or two hours before bed.

In addition, people with PD can:

  • Use satin sheets and pajamas to make moving in the bed easier.
  • Minimize drinking liquids for three hours before bedtime to help prevent frequent nighttime urination.
  • Go to the bathroom immediately before retiring.
  • Place a commode next to the bed, to minimize the effort, and the light needed, to get up during the night.

Sleep Advice from Davis Phinny Foundation

From https://www.davisphinneyfoundation.org/living-well/sleep/

What causes sleep problems in Parkinson’s?

Difficulties with sleep can be caused by a number of factors. Some are directly related to Parkinson’s and its treatments, while others are completely unrelated. While many common issues can be improved with minor medication changes or other tweaks, it is important to understand the causes of common sleep issues associated with Parkinson’s and to discuss with your neurologist and other members of your care team to get the best sleep you possibly can.

read more

MEDICATIONS read more

PAIN read more

ANXIETY, DEPRESSION AND OTHER PSYCHOLOGICAL ISSUES read more

NIGHTTIME TRIPS TO THE BATHROOM (NOCTURIA) read more

CAUSES NOT RELATED TO PARKINSON’S read more

pain not connected to Parkinson’s or sleep apnea.

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Simple Relaxation Techniques

From parkinsonsnewstoday.com

If  you have Parkinson’s disease, you are likely to feel stress related to your tremors. Sometimes, you may feel self-conscious. That alone is stressful. These simple relaxation solutions open up natural relaxation responses which can help improve your mood and ease your mind.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) considers relaxation exercises to be safe for most people. However, just like with exercise routines, people with serious physical health problems such as Parkinson’s should discuss the techniques with their healthcare provider before starting a relaxation routine.

There are many viable techniques for relaxing. These include deep breathing exercises, self-hypnosis, and guided imagery. Each relaxation technique goal is to produce a natural reaction from the body. This should include: lower blood pressure, slower breathing, and a sense of well-being.

We found five easy relaxation exercises that are simple enough for most people to do1 in a chair or while lying in bed.

The first two relaxation tips come from Harvard University and the last three are from the University of Michigan.

Place your hand just beneath your navel so you can feel the gentle rise and fall of your belly as you breathe. Breathe in. Pause for a count of three. Breathe out. Pause for a count of three. Continue to breathe deeply for one minute, pausing for a count of three after each inhalation and exhalation.

While sitting comfortably, take a few slow deep breaths and quietly repeat to yourself, “I am” as you breathe in and, “at peace” as you breathe out. Repeat slowly two or three times. Then, feel your entire body relax into the support of your chair.

Raise eyebrows up and tense the muscles across the forehead and scalp. Feel the tension build and hold. Take a deep breath. As you exhale say “relax” while letting the tension leave your body.

Relax your facial muscles and allow your jaw to open slightly. Let your shoulders drop. Let your arms fall to your sides. Allow your hands to loosen so there are spaces between your fingers. Uncross your legs or ankles. Feel your thighs sink into your chair, letting your legs fall comfortably apart. Feel your shins and calves become heavier and your feet grow roots into the floor. Now, breathe in slowly and breathe out slowly.

Observe your abdomen rising and falling with each breath. Inhale and press your navel toward the spine then tense your abdomen. Feel the tension build and hold it. Take in a deep breath. As you exhale say “relax,” and let the tension leave you.

Here’s a PDF with more relaxation techniques from the University of Michigan.

The NIH recognizes the relaxation response as having broad health benefits including the reduction of pain and restoration of sleep. In addition, research on the relaxation response has shown that this simple technique can increase energy and decrease fatigue. It can increase motivation, productivity, and improve decision-making ability, too. The relaxation response lowers stress hormone levels and lowers blood pressure.

The relaxation response is your personal ability to make your body release chemicals and brain signals that make your muscles and organs slow down and increase blood flow to the brain. We hope these stress relieving solutions help you find a relaxation routine that suits you so that you will continue to practice it each day.


Five Steps to a Caregiving Plan for Your Family

From AARP Prepare to Care Manual

This guide is designed to help you and other family members discuss and create a caregiving plan for yourself or an aging parent, other relative, or close friend or neighbor. Each of the following five steps includes information on how to get started, questions to ask, and where to find basic resources. Don’t be discouraged if you can’t answer every question or fill in every blank. And remember, you don’t have to do it all at once. The important thing is to start—and continue—the conversation in a way that works for you and your family. STEP 1 Prepare to Talk STEP 2 Form Your Team STEP 3 Assess Needs STEP 4 Make a Plan STEP 5 Take Action


Rest and sleep

Parkinson’s disease creates many challenges to getting a good night’s rest. Try these tips to help you get enough rest and sleep, which is an important component of overall health and quality of life.

Getting a Good Night’s Rest

  • Make a regular, relaxing bedtime routine a habit.
  • Maintain a regular sleep schedule: get up and go to sleep at the same time every day.
  • Get plenty of bright light exposure during the day, particularly natural daytime light.
  • Decrease fluids several hours before bedtime, and go to the bathroom before getting into bed to sleep.
  • Avoid strenuous exercise, alcohol, nicotine and caffeine within 4 hours of your bedtime.
  • Use your bed only for sleeping and intimacy with your partner.
  • Banish animals from the bed!
  • Customize your sleep environment: invest in a good mattress and pillows.
  • Set the bedroom temperature at a cool, comfortable level.
  • Limit daytime napping to a 40-minute NASA nap (yes, tested by astronauts!).
  • Lie down to sleep only when sleepy. Learn to tell the difference between fatigue and sleepiness.
  • If you are unable to sleep after 15 minutes, get out of bed and engage in a relaxing activity like listening to music, meditation or reading until you are sleepy.
  • Turn off the TV. If weaning yourself of a TV habit is difficult, try a relaxation or nature recording.
  • Keep lighting and noise at low levels when trying to sleep.
  • Eliminate the common but bad habit of “checking the clock” throughout the night.
  • Limit prescription sedatives to a 2-week period; instead, try over-the-counter alternatives such as Valerian root capsules.
  • Sleep as much as needed to feel refreshed, but avoid spending too much time in bed.

Getting into Bed

  • Approach the bed as you would a chair; feel the mattress behind both legs.
  • Slowly lower yourself to a seated position on the bed, using your arms to control your descent.
  • Lean on your forearm while you allow your body to lean down to the side.
  • As you body goes down, the legs will want to go up like a seesaw.
  • DO NOT put your knee up on the mattress first. In other words, don’t “crawl” into bed.

Rolling or Turning Over in Bed

  • Bend your knees up with feet flat.
  • Allow knees to fall to one side as you begin to roll.
  • Turn your head in the direction you are rolling and reach top arm across the body.
  • Some PD patients find that “silk sheets” help them move better in bed.

Scooting Over in Bed

  • Bend your knees up with feet flat.
  • Push into the bed with feet and hand to lift your hips up off the bed. Then shift hips in the desired direction.
  • Finish by repositioning feet in the direction your hips moved.

Getting Out of Bed

  • Bend knees up, feet flat on the bed.
  • Roll onto your side toward the edge of the bed by letting the knees fall to that side. Reach across with the top arm, and turn your head to look in the direction you are rolling.
  • Lower your feet from the bed as you push with your arms into a sitting position.


May 18, 2017 – Sleeping Well with Parkinson’s – on line discussion

Hear expert discussion, and ask questions in MJ Fox Foundation Third Thursdays Webinar series.

Sleep disturbances are a common non-motor symptom of Parkinson’s disease that may cause difficulty falling or staying asleep. In this webinar, we’ll discuss sleep disorders that can occur in Parkinson’s, how to manage them and current research on sleep and PD.

Title: Sleeping Well with Parkinson’s

Date: Thursday, May 18, 2017

Time: 12:00 PM Eastern Time

Duration: 1 hour


Sunnyview’s Adaptive Recreation Experiences program

Introducing the 2017 Summer Adaptive Recreation Experiences … Sunnyview’s Adaptive Recreation Experiences program provides individuals with disabilities the opportunity to return to previously enjoyed activities or to try something new. Sessions are designed to encourage and assist each participant to have fun, and be successful on a variety of levels. All programs are open to those in wheelchairs, as well as ambulatory participants. Experiences are staffed by Sunnyview therapists, volunteers, and experts in that specific activity. Each activity offers a unique opportunity to try our adaptive equipment

More information on printable flyer here


11 Facts About Parkinson’s Disease You May Not Know

Most people know of Parkinson’s disease and have a good idea of its symptoms, but very few know much more than that about this progressive illness. Since April is Parkinson’s disease awareness month, we’ve put together some simple stats and facts that you can share near and far.

This post appeared first on Parkinson’s News Today.

With help from the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation, everydayhealth.com, and ecaring.com, here are 11 facts about the disease most people don’t know. (Some of them may even surprise you!)

It’s a movement disorder. 
Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease whereby cells responsible for producing dopamine die off in the substantia nigra area of the brain. Dopamine is essential for movement as it acts as a transmitter for signals from the brain to other parts of the body.

Who found it?
Parkinson’s disease was discovered by British surgeon Dr. James Parkinson in 1817.

How prevalent is it?
Approximately one million people have Parkinson’s disease in the U.S. and there are around 50,000 new cases diagnosed eac1h year.

Most patients are middle-aged. 
The average age of someone diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease is 56. Around 4 percent of Parkinson’s patients are diagnosed before the age of 50 and it’s considered young-onset if diagnosed before the age of 40.

When is it considered young-onset Parkinson’s disease?
It’s considered young-onset if diagnosed before the age of 40. The youngest recorded case of Parkinson’s was a 12-year-old patient.

How is it diagnosed?
There is no blood test or scan that can diagnose Parkinson’s disease. Doctors look for four classic symptoms of the disease before reaching a diagnosis: tremors, rigidity in the wrist and elbow joints, lack or slowness of movement, and an unstable posture.

It affects mostly men. 
Parkinson’s disease is twice as likely to affect men than women.

There’s no known cause. 
There is no known cause of Parkinson’s disease although a family history of the disease will increase your risk. Researchers think environmental factors such as smoking, pollution, heavy metals, medications and illegal drugs may be responsible for the onset of the disease. Head trauma, brain inflammation, and stroke have also been associated with the disease.

Parkinson’s is expensive. 
Treating patients with Parkinson’s disease costs the U.S. around $25 billion a year. The average patient will need $2,500 worth of medication each year and therapeutic surgery could cost up to $100,000.

How do you treat it? 
There is no cure for Parkinson’s disease but there are medications that can help patients with the symptoms. Patients can also undergo deep brain stimulation where electrical current is used to help block tremors and other movement symptoms of the disease.

There’s a correlation between Parkinson’s and depression. 
Dopamine is also associated with mood as well as movement. It’s estimated that more than half of Parkinson’s disease patients suffer from depression and around 40 percent suffer from anxiety.


10 Organizations That Support Parkinson’s Disease Patients and Their Families

If you’re struggling with Parkinson’s disease or know someone who is, it’s incredibly helpful to have a list of organizations that can support you or your loved one along the way. The following is not an exhaustive list, but hopefully it will prove to be a helpful resource.

The post 10 Organizations That Support Parkinson’s Disease Patients and Their Families appeared first on Parkinson’s News Today.

1. National Parkinson’s Foundation helps patients actively enjoy life through expert care and treatment research.

2. American Parkinson’s Disease Association provides support, education, and research to help you live a fuller life.

3. Michael J. Fox Foundation is helping to raise money for much-needed research to help find a cure. From ways you can get involved to a great blog chock-full of Parkinson’s-related information, there is so much information here.

4. Parkinson’s Disease Foundation provides information including news about the disease, information about upcoming events, insight into the latest research, and education about what to expect.

5. European Parkinson’s Disease Association advocates for the rights and needs of patients and their families.

6. The Davis Phinney Foundation is committed to supporting programs as well as research that help to deliver inspiration, information and provide tools that will enable people living with Parkinson’s to have more control in managing their disease.

7. The Parkinson Alliance is the umbrella organization for the Parkinson’s Unity Walk that takes place every spring in New York City. They also sponsor Team Parkinson, a fundraising racing event. You can find current news and information on research projects on their site.

8. Partners in Parkinson’s has a program where you can be connected to an advocate who will listen, offer advice and support to patients and caregivers at no cost. This is just one of the services you can find through Partners in Parkinson’s.

9. Caring.com has a support group for caregivers, family and friends of those with Parkinson’s disease. No subject is off-limits in this forum.

10. The National Parkinson Foundation has a site specifically geared to caregivers. They help carers navigate the emotional, financial, and physical challenges they may face caring for someone with Parkinson’s.

Having resources that help keep you informed, and offer support and encouragement to patients and their loved ones is so important. These are just 10 of the hundreds of organizations out there that are available to you. You can search online or visit your local library for more.


Can Stress Cause Parkinson’s?

Read more

Conclusion
“We speculate that chronic emotional stress may cause dopaminergic cell loss in susceptible individuals and propose that functional somatic syndromes are commonly seen in patients with PD. Dopaminergic dysfunction with abnormalities in striato–thalamo–cortical brain circuits may be the shared underlying cause.”


Positive Thinking may improve health and extend life

“Look on the sunny side of life.”
“Turn your face toward the sun, and the shadows will fall behind you.”
“Every day may not be good, but there is something good in every day.”
“See the glass as half-full, not half-empty.”
Researchers are finding that thoughts like these, the hallmarks of people sometimes called “cockeyed optimists,” can do far more than raise one’s spirits. They may actually improve health and extend life.

Read more 


Online video gallery

Partners in Parkinson’s has opened a video gallery online to help educate people about the disease and to support services to Parkinson’s patients worldwide. The group is also planning to host information events in two U.S. cities this year.

The gallery’s aim is to bring essential information to patients that can help improve their care at every stage of Parkinson’s. The events carry a more personal touch.

“I feel more comfortable . . . more knowledgeable, more connected and more hopeful,” said a  participant at a New York event in 2016. “Thank you for a powerful day.”

This year, the live events that bring information, educational tools and resources to patients will be in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and Orlando, Florida, according to a press release.

Online video gallery

The online gallery at the Partners in Parkinson’s website can be accessed at any time.

Its videos include stories by Parkinson’s patients and caregivers, and talks with healthcare professionals and researchers working on the disease.

 


Art Therapy and Parkinson’s Disease

Find Pleasure: Art making should be enjoyable. There is no such thing as a “wrong” mark. Every expression is valid.

Experience Control: Art making is an activity in which the artist can experience choice (through color, medium, line, etc.) and control over one’s environment.

Value Individuality: Free creation can encourage spontaneity which can, in turn, improve confidence.

Express Oneself: An experience of slowed speech or flat affect can limit one’s ability to communicate. Art is another language for communication which can be done at the artist’s own pace.

Relax: Art making has been proven to lower blood pressure, reduce perseverative thoughts, and lift depression. 

Improve Flow in Mind/Body Connection: In a relaxed state when focus is on the artistic expression rather than on the physical movement itself, motion can become more fluid. 

Promote Concentration, Memory, Executive Functions, Improve Hand-eye Coordination: Art making increases bilateral activity in the brain. When drawing, one uses both the right and left hemispheres of the brain. This is a wonderful way to take greater advantage of mental resources.

Read more


Exercise Can Be a Boon to People With Parkinson’s Disease – NY Times

“The earlier people begin exercising after a Parkinson’s diagnosis, and the higher the intensity of exercise they achieve, the better they are,” Marilyn Moffat, a physical therapist on the faculty of New York University, said. “Many different activities have been shown to be beneficial, including cycling, boxing, dancing and walking forward and backward on a treadmill. If someone doesn’t like one activity, there are others that can have equally good results.”

Read more


The benefits of controlled breathing 

Take a deep breath, expanding your belly. Pause. Exhale slowly to the count of five. Repeat four times.

Congratulations. You’ve just calmed your nervous system.

Controlled breathing, like what you just practiced, has been shown to reduce stress, increase alertness and boost your immune system.

From The New York Times read more


National Parkinson Foundation toll-free Helpline

The National Parkinson Foundation (NPF) runs a toll-free Helpline, 1-800-4PD-INFO, (473-4636) The lifesaving NPF Helpline, launched in 2010, is staffed by a team of patient-focused nurses, social workers and therapists who answer calls about Parkinson’s disease (PD) in English and in Spanish Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST.

“NPF’s Helpline links our groundbreaking research to improve the lives of people with Parkinson’s today directly with the community we serve,” I know this first hand because the Helpline has made a difference in the life of my mother, who is living with Parkinson’s.” –John Kozyak, NPF’s Chairman of the Board. ”

“We’re more than just an information line. We truly care about the people we serve and that’s the key to our success, Whether you have yet to receive a diagnosis, are recently diagnosed with Parkinson’s, or caring for a family member with the disease, we are here to help you understand your condition, your care, and the latest research on how patients can live their best lives with Parkinson’s. We spend as much as 45 minutes on calls with those who have been recently diagnosed – more than three times the average – because we can really make a difference.” –  Adolfo Diaz, NPF’s Director of Patient Services who manages the Helpline.”

NPF’s Helpline Specialists help callers locate resources in their area, as well as send a customized informational packet after the call. The NPF packets arm people with Parkinson’s and their families with helpful information on preparing for an appointment with their general practitioner or movement disorder specialist. People with Parkinson’s disease, their care partners and families are invited to call to receive emotional support and referrals to health professionals and community resources. A wide variety of helpful NPF publications and the Aware in Care kit are also available for order through the Helpline.

NPF also has an online video series called, “Ask the Helpline,” where our PD Specialists answer the most frequently asked questions including: why exercise is important, what role a movement disorder specialist plays and how the role of caregiver changes over time.

People with questions about PD may also e-mail the NPF Helpline at helpline@parkinson.org.

 


ELISPOON – the bowl of the spoon remains horizontal and keeps the food in place.

Whatever movement of the wrist is performed, the bowl of the spoon remains horizontal and keeps the food in place.

The material used is lightweight and strong.  A key characteristic is the spoon’s affordability.

There are no electrical components or batteries, making it carry anywhere and to clean.

ELISPOON is a product designed and built to ease the life of the users and their love.

Two graduates from Israel’s Technion developed a spoon that their child with motor co-ordination problems could use without spilling its contents.   Now anyone can buy it. Useful also for the elderly or anyone suffering from tremor


Use the website forum to ask a question or start a discussion

An Internet forum is a discussion area on a website. Website members can post discussions and read and respond to posts by other forum members. A forum can be focused on nearly any subject and a sense of an online community, or virtual community, tends to develop among forum members. A forum usually allows all members to make posts and start new topics.

 

Start a discussion or ask a question by starting here.

 


Michael J Fox Foundation, ‘Faces of Parkinson’s’, 2014


The benefits of Tai Chi

It isn’t every day that an effective new treatment for some Parkinson’s disease symptoms comes along. Especially one that is safe, causes no adverse side effects, and may also benefit the rest of the body and the mind. That’s why I read with excitement and interest a report in the New England Journal of Medicine showing that tai chi may improve balance and prevent falls among people with Parkinson’s disease. Tai chi improves balance and motor control in Parkinson’s disease

(more…)


Oregon Research Institute Tai Chi Program helps Parkinson’s Disease Patients

An Oregon Research Institute (ORI) exercise study conducted in four Oregon cities has shown significant benefits for patients with mild-to-moderate Parkinson’s disease. In an original article published in the February 9, 2012 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine(NEJM), ORI scientist Fuzhong Li, Ph.D. and colleagues report that a tailored program of twice-weekly Tai Chi training resulted in improved postural stability and walking ability, and reduced falls in the participants.

Read more 


LSVT Loud and LSVT Big – voice and movement treatments

Recent advances in neuroscience have suggested that exercise-based behavioral treatments may improve function and possibly slow progression of motor symptoms in individuals with Parkinson disease (PD). The LSVT (Lee Silverman Voice Treatment) Programs for individuals with PD have been developed and researched over the past 20 years beginning with a focus on the speech motor system (LSVT LOUD) and more recently have been extended to address limb motor systems (LSVT BIG).

(more…)


Parkinson’s Disease and Diet

Overview

No one specific diet is recommended for everyone with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Still, what you eat may impact how well your medication works and can help some of the non-motor symptoms that are associated with PD. For general health and well-being, doctors encourage people with Parkinson’s to follow a balanced diet, which includes whole grains, healthy fats (in foods like nuts, avocado and olive oil) and antioxidants.

Get the Parkinson’s and Diet printable booklet from the MJ Fox foundation.


Constipation

Difficulty swallowing, feelings of nausea or bloating, constipation, and difficulty eliminating are all common symptoms of PD.

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World Parkinson’s Congress 2016

The triennial World Parkinson Congresses provide an international forum for dialogue on the latest scientific discoveries, medical practices, and caregiver initiatives related to Parkinson’s disease.

(more…)


Coffee is your friend

coffee-beans-1400Caffeine-based compounds show promise against Parkinson’s disease

Two caffeine-based chemical compounds have been developed that show promise in preventing the ravages of Parkinson’s disease. Parkinson’s disease attacks the nervous system, causing uncontrolled shakes, muscle stiffness, and slow, imprecise movement, chiefly in middle-aged and elderly people. It is caused by the loss of brain cells (neurons) that produce dopamine, an essential neurotransmitter that allows neurons to “talk” to each other.

Read more

(more…)


Educational Brochures

Image result for brochure parkinson's sampleInformation and research about Parkinson’s Disease is changing quickly.  Depending on information that is more than a few years old is not advised.
We are not endorsing or guaranteeing the accuracy of any of the supplied links.  We have not created, reviewed (or even read) all of the educational material referenced.  You may find outdated, false of contradictory information.
You may want to find the material(s) that would be useful to you and/or your patients and ask a doctor familiar with PD to review them before handing them out.

From the Michael J. Fox Foundation:

Educational Web Pages at https://www.michaeljfox.org/understanding-parkinsons/index.html?navid=understanding-pd


From Parkinson’s Disease Foundatation

PDF offers a variety of educational publications and programs for people with Parkinson’s, their caregivers and families and allied health professionals.  These materials can help answer questions about Parkinson’s disease symptoms, medications, medical care, exercise and nutrition, among other issues.

You can download all materials by using the links below and to the left.  You can also order most of these materials online free of charge, for yourself or, in bulk for your practice, hospital or support group.

Brochures and Booklets
These informational brochures help you understand Parkinson’s and find resources in the community. Order your copies online today or download each individually.

Videos/DVDs
PDF offers one free educational DVD/video, Diagnosis Parkinson’s Disease: You Are Not AlonePlease click here to read more and order this program online.

Fact Sheets
PDF’s fact sheets discuss your concerns about nutrition, diet, exercise and more, providing tips on how to improve daily life with Parkinson’s. These are written by physicians and people living with or affected by Parkinson’s. You can order print copies of the fact sheets or download those that interest you from our selection of 35+ fact sheets.

Online Seminars

PDF reserves a limited supply of DVDs of our previous series of PD ExpertBriefings for those unable to watch via computer. If you would like to order this set to watch at home or with your support group members, please read more and download our order form.

http://www.pdf.org/brochureshttp://www.pdf.org/newsletters_pubs


From APDA

http://www.apdaparkinson.org/resources-support/download-publications/


From American Academy of Neurology

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a movement disorder. In people with PD, a vital chemical in the brain called dopamine is gradually reduced. This brings on symptoms of tremor, slowness in movement, stiff limbs, and walking or balance problems.


Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

https://patienteducation.osumc.edu/pages/patienteducation/atoztopicdetail.aspx?t=Parkinson%27s%20Disease


Preventing falls

Image result for fallingIf you or a loved one has Parkinson’s disease, here are tips for preventing falls around the home:

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PARKINSON’S: stand. freeze? move!

Here’s EZ ways to get “unstuck” or help your Parkinson’s partner or relative when they find themselves struggling to take a step.


The Every Victory Counts® Manual – Davis Phinney Foundation

Essential Information and Inspiration for a Lifetime of Wellness

Unique in the world of Parkinson’s resources, the Every Victory Counts® manual gives people living with Parkinson’s – and their caregivers and family members – the tools they need to take control of their own Parkinson’s treatment through a proactive approach to self-care.

Click to read and/or download the book as a PDF file (5mb, 275 page printable book)

Every Victory Counts manual


On-line resources

These Parkinson’s disease (PD) resources will help you find more information and connect with others living with the condition. Many of these sites will direct you to the latest Parkinson’s disease news and research, as well as opportunities to get involved with local chapters and organizations.

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Ten nutrition tips for living well with Parkinson’s

1) VITAMIN D – Studies have shown widespread deficiency of vitamin D among people with PD; whether it contributes to the development of PD, or is a result of PD, is not yet known. But deficiency is associated with falls and fractures, diabetes, cancers and autoimmune diseases. You may want to ask your doctor to check your Vitamin D level, and take supplements as needed.

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Bone Thinning

As Parkinson’s progresses, mobility challenges become more common, including an increased risk of falls. Unfortunately, studies have shown that people with PD are also at increased risk for bone thinning, a combination that can lead to injury.

Therefore, it is especially important for people with PD to eat meals that provide bone-strengthening nutrients, such as calcium, magnesium and vitamins D and K. Regular exposure to sunlight is also helpful, as it increases vitamin D in the body.

Walking and other weight-bearing exercises can keep bones strong and less likely to fracture or break.


YMCA Parkinson’s Wellness Program

The Capital District YMCA is now offering Parkinson’s Wellness Program (PWP!) Training! The class is neuroplasticity-principled and holds promise to slow disease progression, retire motor function, and increase longevity and quality of life. The class will be led by certified instructors trained in PWP! Fitness, and Gary Z Sobol Parkinson’s Network (GZSPN™) by Gail Borden of Marblehead, MA.

Participants should be able to walk and stand unassisted. Individuals with MS or in Post Stroke Recovery are also encouraged to attend, with participant waiver and medical clearance. Please see the table below for more information on specific class times.

7 Week Sessions are ongoing, check your local branch for more details.
1x weekly: Members $45, Community $56 / 2x weekly: Members $80, Community $91
Caregivers are welcome with paid registration.

Branch Day Time Instructor
Bethlehem Thursdays 12:00pm Nancy Janosi
Glenville Fridays 10:15am Lisa Temoshok
Greenbush Fridays 10:30am Sondra Tucker
Guilderland Wednesdays 1:45pm Kathy Napoli
Schenectady Wednesdays 6:00pm Myra Woods
Southern Saratoga Thursdays 10:30am Shannon Felix
Troy Mondays 11:30am Tammy Roberts
and
Michael Malone