Dance


Dance class brings joy, confidence to people with Parkinson’s

Video from WNYT Benita Zahn story about Parkinson’s Dance at Ciccotti Center

Click on photo to start video

http://wnyt.com/health/dance-c lass-for-people-with-parkinson s-disease-ciccotti-center- colonie-albany-county/4672954/

November 16, 2017 06:14 PM

COLONIE – Parkinson’s disease is a progressive brain disorder that causes loss of muscle control. It affects about a million Americans.

Increasingly, those affected are turning to dance as therapy.

About five months ago, a local dance teacher started a class for people with Parkinson’s. Then, she learned about “Dance for Parkinson’s,” a program that got its start in 2001 in Brooklyn and has gone global.

She was invited to take the training class. Now, there’s a whole lot of happy feet.

Once a week, a group of people living with Parkinson’s Disease toss care to the wind and give themselves over to music and motion. It’s the “Dance for Parkinson’s” class at the Ciccotti Center in Colonie.

As the disease slowly robs them of their ability to move, the dance moves work on balance and coordination, cognition and personal confidence.

“It is a very bright spot in the week. Just that dancing and having fun and throwing your arms around and stuff. So I like that a lot,” explained Patricia Clock, a Parkinson’s patient.

The class incorporates movement from modern, ballet, tap, folk and social dancing – along with yoga.

“My wife has been trying to get me to dance ever since we were married and I’m really a horrible dancer,” admitted Jud Eson.

He was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease five years ago. He and his wife, Nancy, learned about “Dance for Parkinson’s” a few years ago when they spent time in Brooklyn where the program was born. So they were thrilled when longtime dance teacher, Rachelle Smith-Stallman, who’d started a Parkinson’s dance class in June, embraced the concept, undergoing training from “Dance for Parkinson’s.” The training helped hone specific moves to share with her classes bringing the most benefit to participants.

“I get the whole body going. I certainly work every single muscle possible. I use a lot of rhythm,” explained Smith-Stallman. “It really gives spirit. It gives joy,” she noted.

That joy may be at the heart of the class. That and the sense of community, because too often, as the disease progresses, the world shrinks. Here, there are no boundaries.

“‘Cause exercise is the best medicine for Parkinson’s disease,” pointed out Eson.

The classes are held weekly at the Ciccotti Center. They cost $5 a class. Just call to register.


Dance Through Parkinson’s Testimonials

​​The​re are ​many reasons that I enjoy participating in the Dancing ​Through Parkinson’s program. ​Here is my list:

​The brain can be changed by doing new activities. Dancing requires concentration and coordination, which help​s my brain​ stay sharp​. My neurologist is very pleased with my stable condition and says to keep up the exercise, including D​TP. T​his is just as important as ​​my medications, in ​her opinion.

I enjoy meeting the other ​people with Parkinson’s. D​TP provides a support group atmosphere, even though that was not the original intention of the program.

Rachelle ​brings a sense of joy to the class by playing interesting music and making the class fun and exciting . Th​e class always ​leaves me feeling uplifted.

Jud Eson – Dance Participant


Dance for Parkinson’s was something I didn’t have much interest in, especially since I couldn’t dance before I was diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease (PD) 11 years ago.  Through the cajoling of friends, I hesitantly went perhaps a month after the classes had started.  I was amazed by the positive energy that the instructor exuded and the physical/emotional benefit was measurable.  The class benefits  those who have extreme limitations and to those who have been recently diagnosed.  Since Rachelle’s most recent training in NYC with the Mark Morris Dance Group, the class has seen a higher focus on fine motor skills, gait training, coordination, and balance exercises, which translates into real life benefits of dressing one’s self without help, walking, typing, thinking, and the general well being of individuals who have been inflicted by PD. Beyond the physical benefits, I spoken to a number of people in the class whereby Dance for PD is their only social outlet for the week.
While the class is being partially subsidized by the local PD support group, the weekly cost of $5 may seem at first glance as “affordable”, one must remember that generally speaking, PD patients are older and typically on a fixed income.  In my case, the impact of PD has forced me to stop working, and I too am now on a fixed income. It would be my hope that the making the Dance for PD class free would allow class size to grow with many of these PD dancers being able to experience the benefits of the Ciccotti Center.   Making the PD Dance class free would make it available to more PD patients.
While medical breakthroughs have been limited, exercise in any format has shown to slow down the progression of PD by as much as 30%.

Patrick Klee – Dance Participant


I would like to thank the Ciccotti Center for hosting this class! It is one of the activities I truly look forward to attending on a regular basis.
I was diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease (PD) almost 20 years ago. For me, the best thing is exercise… all different forms of exercise and movement. The variety for me is important.
Besides taking the Dance/Movement class I also take a (non-contact) boxing class and a spin class (stationary bike). The dance class to me is like a PD Support Group. We get together, chat, take the class, and then chat more. This is one of the few places I feel comfortable to make mistakes and not over think about my symptoms. We are a group of like individuals taking the class with
limited opportunities to have the camaraderie of others in public. This class gives that to us. The smiles, laughter, and joy that emit from the room can be amazing. I appreciate this opportunity to let you know how grateful I am of the Cicotti Center’s support.

Bruce Plotsky – Dance Participant


Channeling Dance to Keep Moving with Parkinson’s

“Seven years ago, I was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, for which there is still no cure. I had but two options, I could live in fear, or I could scare myself healthy. I scared myself healthy, and so can you.”

Exercise is an important part of healthy living for everyone. For people with Parkinson’s disease (PD), exercise is more than healthy — it is a vital component to maintaining balance, mobility and activities of daily living. Exercise and physical activity can improve many PD symptoms. These benefits are supported by research.

Read more


According to a study published in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience Journal, dancing, especially when followed by a change in choreography, is superior to repetitive physical activities such as walking or cycling.

People who are physically active can slow down their brain’s aging process. Neuroscientists behind this study say that dancing is the most effective physical activity.

In their study, they prove that 2 different types of physical activity, dancing and endurance training  both increase the brain’s area that declines over time as we age. But, only dancing has proved to be effective when it comes to changes in behavior due to the noticeable improvements in balance.
The researchers selected 52 elderly volunteers aged 63-80 years for the purpose of the study. Then, they divided them randomly into two groups, one group was assigned to join dance classes, and the other group joined the sports control group.
The dance group took dance lessons with a constant change of choreography which moves they were asked to memorize. The program for the sports group, on the other hand, consisted of strength training, endurance training, and flexibility training.
The hippocampus area of the brain which is the most susceptible to decline because of the aging processes has increased in both groups. This area of the brain is also responsible for memory, balance, as well as learning.
But, only volunteers in the dance group had an increased volume of other subparts in the left hippocampus. Moreover, only dancing had increased the volume of one part in the right hippocampus called the subiculum.
This study proved that dancing, especially when followed by a change in choreography, is indeed superior to repetitive physical activities such as walking or cycling.


More than 35 peer reviewed scientific research studies conducted at a number of major university research centers around the world including Roehampton University, University of Florida, Queensland University of Technology, York University and the University of Freiburg point to the benefits of dance for people with Parkinson’s. A number of leading neurologists and movement disorder specialists around the world include Dance for PD classes among a shortlist of recommended activities for their patients.


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Exercise Classes

 

Always consult your physician before beginning any exercise program. This general information is not intended to diagnose any medical condition or to replace your healthcare professional. Consult with your healthcare professional to design an appropriate exercise prescription. If you experience any pain or difficulty with these exercises, stop and consult your healthcare provider.


Dance Through Parkinson’s – Classes are every Tuesday from 1:30 to 3:00 PM at Rudy A. Ciccotti Recreation Center, 30 Aviation Road, Albany, NY 12205, (518) 867-8920 – $5.00 per class*

P4P-Pedaling for Parkinson’s –Saratoga YMCA no charge – Monday & Friday – phone (518) 583-9622

P4P-Duanesburg/Delanson YMCA – Monday’s and Thursday’s (518) 895-9500 member’s free, non-members $6.00.

P4P-Southern Saratoga (Clifton Park YMCA) – Monday, Wednesday, Friday- members free, non-members $5.00 – phone (518) 371-2139

PWR – Parkinson’s Wellness Recovery Class Thursdays 10:30 – 11:45 Cost $45 for 7 weeks – Clifton Park YMCA – 1 Wall Street, Clifton Park, NY 12065 – Phone (518) 371-2139 Contact the Y for more information

P4P-Glenville YMCA –  Monday, Tuesday, Thursday– Members free, non-members $5.00—phone (518) 399-8118

Neuromotor Wellness – Glenville YMCA – Monday’s 12 noon – 1:15 PM.

P4P-Troy YMCA – Monday, Wednesday, Friday – Members free, non-members $5.00– (518) 272-5900

P4P-Guilderland YMCA – Monday, Wednesday, Friday – Member’s Free, non-members $5.00-Contact Chris Wilson – (518) 456-3634 ext 1140 for more information

P4P- Bethlehem YMCA – Monday, Wednesday, Friday, Parkinson’s Wellness Class Thursdays 12 N -1:45 Cost $45 for 7 weeks –– Phone (518) 439-4394 Contact the Y for more information

Schott’s Boxing, 21 Vatrano Road, Albany, NY 12205 (518) 641-9064- Friday’s 10:00 AM -The cost is $10.00 for the initial visit which covers the cost of the hand wraps. Hope Soars is partnering with Schott’s and will pay most of the membership fee which will be determined based on class size. If you have any questions, please contact Mark Burek (518) 428-0056.

Rock Steady Boxing CNY, 209 Oswego Street #12, Liverpool, NY. Classes are Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.   Contact Jeannette Riley (315) 622-2332 for assessment appointment and more information. Check Website CNY.rsbaffiliate.com for class information.

Rock Steady Boxing (RSB) at the Centers at St. Camilus, 813 Fay Road, Syracuse, NY 13219, Classes are Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11:45 – 1:15. Call for information, (315) 488-2112

Rock Steady Boxing for Onondaga County is daily, call (315) 622-2332 for more information

Yoga Class- Honest Weight Coop, 100 Watervliet Avenue, Albany, NY, Thursday, Free for Parkinson’s Patients and their family/caregivers, for information call Instructor Tamara Cookingham (518) 495-3239 tamaracookingham@gmail.com


A swell of research is showing how dance can benefit Parkinson’s sufferers

To dance is human; people of all ages and levels of motor ability express movements in response to music.

Professional dancers exert a great deal of creativity and energy toward developing their skills and different styles of dance.

How dancers move in beautiful and sometimes unexpected ways can delight, and the synchrony between dancers moving together can be entrancing.

To us as a neuroscientist and biomechanist (Lena), and a rehabilitation scientist and dancer (Madeleine), understanding the complexities of motor skill in a ballet move, or the physical language of coordination in partner dance, is an inspiring and daunting challenge.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4686924/TANGO-stave-effects-Parkinson-s-disease.html


Wednesday, June 21, 2017 – Live from Brooklyn: Dance for PD

For those who haven’t tried the local Dance for PD class which is held weekly at the Ciccotti center off Wolf Rd, this will give you a taste of what the class is like.

Here is information about our local class. – CLASSES MEET EVERY TUESDAY FROM 1:30 TO 3:00 (no class on July 4th) at Rudy A. Ciccotti Family Recreation Center – 30 Aviation Road – Albany, 12205 – (518) 867-8920

Live from Brooklyn:

Dance for PD

Wednesday, June 21

2:15-3:30 PM (US Eastern Time)

Join us as we continue our season of live-streamed Dance for PD® classes from the Mark Morris Dance Center in Brooklyn, NY.

No registration required—just click below at the scheduled time.

Class taught by John Heginbotham | Music by William Wade

Can’t make it? Click here to enjoy archived classes.


Dancing Might Help Prevent Parkinson’s, Recent Research Points Out

Dancing helps prevent Parkinson’s disease, obesity, dementia, depression and anxiety, says Dr. Patricia Bragg, CEO of organic health company Bragg Live Food Products.“New studies show that dancing increases your memory and helps prevent a wide variety of diseases such as Alzheimer’s,” Bragg said in a press release.

Bragg’s father, Dr. Paul C. Bragg, was the originator of health stores in the United States, in 1912. For both father and daughter, dancing became a way of life.

Today, the 87-year-old Bragg sees herself as a crusader, born to carry on her father’s health movement, which pioneered many approaches that today would be considered “‘alternative medicine.”

“I have been dancing all of my life, and it’s not surprising to me that medical science is proving what I’ve known all along,” said Bragg.

Dancing has indeed been shown to help people with Parkinson’s recover balance and muscle control, as well as to help reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s dementia by 50 percent, which is expected to strike nearly 14 million Americans over the next 30 years.

“Think of the millions who can avoid this trauma simply by dancing,” said Bragg, the author of 10 best-selling “self-health” books.

According to a University of California Berkeley report, dancing has been shown to reduce depression, anxiety and stress and boost self-esteem. The New York Times also recently reported that dancing improves how the brain processes memory. Another study comparing the neurological effects of country dancing with those of walking and other activities suggested there might be something unique about social dancing.
In fact, dancing seems to increase cognitive acuity at all ages in a singular way, since they demand split-second decisions and exercise neuronal synapses. Dancing also helps keep the only neural connection to memory strong and efficient.
“My memories of dancing with Fred Astaire, Lawrence Welk, Arthur Murray and Gene Kelly are crystal-clear and so is my memory of the great time I had dancing last night,” said Bragg.


Parkinson’s Patients Could Dance Their Way to Better Health

A recent article in the Harvard Gazette suggests dance as a potential treatment for neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD).

Imaging studies have identified several brain regions involved in the complex, rhythmical, and coordinated movements that constitute dance. The motor cortex is — as with other kinds of voluntary movement — involved in planning, controlling, and executing dance moves.

Read more