Monthly Archives: January 2017


Exercise Can Be a Boon to People With Parkinson’s Disease – NY Times

“The earlier people begin exercising after a Parkinson’s diagnosis, and the higher the intensity of exercise they achieve, the better they are,” Marilyn Moffat, a physical therapist on the faculty of New York University, said. “Many different activities have been shown to be beneficial, including cycling, boxing, dancing and walking forward and backward on a treadmill. If someone doesn’t like one activity, there are others that can have equally good results.”

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Parkinson’s patients could be cured of tremors using new ultrasound machine

Parkinson’s patients and others suffering debilitating tremors could be cured of their shaking using a new ultrasound machine which targets their brain cellsDoctors at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust have treated the first patients using the new technique which avoids the need for invasive brain surgery.
Read more 


The benefits of controlled breathing 

Take a deep breath, expanding your belly. Pause. Exhale slowly to the count of five. Repeat four times.

Congratulations. You’ve just calmed your nervous system.

Controlled breathing, like what you just practiced, has been shown to reduce stress, increase alertness and boost your immune system.

From The New York Times read more


Parkinson’s could be treated with shark compound?

Squalamine, a chemical compound found in dogfish sharks, has the potential to reduce the formation of toxic proteins related to the development of Parkinson’s disease, new research suggests

Published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study reveals that squalamine halted the buildup and toxicity of the protein alpha-synuclein (α-synuclein) in roundworm models of Parkinson’s disease and human neuronal cells.

Read more http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/01/16/dogfish-shark-extract-could-help-treat-parkinsons-disease-scientists/


Podcast: Gut Bacteria and Parkinson’s Connection

Listen here https://www.michaeljfox.org/mobile/news-detail.php?podcast-gut-bacteria-and-parkinson-connection

The 100 trillion or so bacteria in our guts are important players in our normal biological processes and in protection against disease. Researchers have begun exploring possible imbalances in some bacteria levels in people with Parkinson’s and how those differences may lead to disease onset or progression. While this area of investigation is still fairly new, the field has some promising leads.


Your symptoms are getting worse over a short time?

Parkinson’s declines slowly, and not over hours, days or weeks. If PD symptoms worsen precipitously over a short period of time, then it is critical to search for secondary causes for these worsening symptoms. Potential causes for worsening Parkinson’s symptoms may include medication changes (which may be intentional changes or due to medication error), infections (such as a urinary tract infection, cold or flu), other medical problems (e.g., dehydration, problems with the heart, lungs, kidneys, liver, etc.), and/or stress, sleep deprivation, etc. read more http://www.pdf.org/en/parkinson_briefing_secrets_myths_question_answer


April 13, 2017 Speaker – safely access and navigate homes – age in place

 April 13, 2017 Monthly Meeting

Join the CDPSG Support Group for the monthly meeting.

The Capital District Parkinson’s Support Group meets at 7 PM the second Thursday of most months at the Beverwyck Senior Center located at Krumkill Road, Slingerlands, New York.

When are our meetings?

There will be networking.  Patients, spouses, siblings, medical professionals/students, friends, and caregivers are welcome to attend to learn more about Parkinson’s disease or obtain information

Lynda Shrager

Lynda Shrager began navigating through the mystifying maze that is our national health care system on the day, more than 19 years ago, when she and her daughter were simultaneously diagnosed with life-threatening medical conditions. After successfully negotiating the crisis and not losing her sanity along the way, she realized it was her organizing skills that were instrumental in getting her through it all. By the time her mother had been diagnosed with a very aggressive cancer, Lynda had become the expert in organizing the tasks that needed to be tackled to manage a serious illness while simultaneously keeping up with all the other aspects of everyday life. The Organized Caregiver was born.

Lynda Shrager, OTR, MSW, is a breast cancer survivor and the author of Otherwise Healthy® – A Planner to Focus Your Thoughts on Organizing Life after Being Diagnosed with Breast Cancer. Her newspaper column Mom’s Rx, now in its eighth year, is published in the Hearst daily Albany Times Union and has appeared in countless newspapers across the country. For over thirty-three years Lynda has practiced in the medical field of geriatric rehabilitation, focusing on all aspects of senior health and wellness.

Lynda combines her expertise as an occupational therapist, master’s level social worker, professional organizer and aging in place specialist to pursue her passion of providing therapeutic care in the patient’s home environment and in educating their caregivers. To that end she is eagerly launching a new initiative called “At Home for Life” to facilitate a senior’s desire to remain in their own home as they face the crossroads of diminished physical and cognitive abilities. Lynda will provide residential assessments and make recommendations to enable people to safely access and navigate their own homes, thereby allowing them to age in place.

Lynda’s engaging, humorous, and motivational presentation style creates a relaxed and comfortable environment that facilitates the educational process. Lynda shares stories and insight from both a personal and professional perspective to inspire her audience.


Fatigue and Parkinson’s 

In this video from the Davis Phinney Foundation, Dr. Andrew Duker discusses some of the reasons why Parkinson’s disease patients get so fatigued and what can be done 

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October 12, 2017 – Capital District Meeting Notice- speaker will be Dr. Eric Molho

Join the CDPSG Support Group for the monthly meeting.

The Capital District Parkinson’s Support Group meets at 7 PM the second Thursday of most months at the Beverwyck Senior Center located at Krumkill Road, Slingerlands, New York.

When are our meetings?

There will be networking.  Patients, spouses, siblings, medical professionals/students, friends, and caregivers are welcome to attend to learn more about Parkinson’s disease or obtain information.

Our speaker will be Dr. Eric Molho

Dr. Eric Molho is Director of one of the only comprehensive Movement Disorders and Parkinson’s Disease Centers in New York State. His practice is almost exclusively devoted to treating Parkinson’s disease, tremor, and dystonia, as well as other movement disorders. Dr. Molho has served as the principal investigator on numerous clinical trials for Parkinson’s disease, enabling him to offer the most advanced treatments and knowledge to his patients. He is also uniquely skilled and experienced in botulinium injections for dystonia, providing patients with optimum results. Patients value his comprehensive and compassionate approach: “The best that I can offer is my time and expertise,” explains Dr. Molho. “These are complex cases and I feel it’s important to take the time to distinguish each individual patient’s needs, tolerance for medication and lifestyle in order to ensure the best treatment outcomes.”
Dr. Molho is a graduate of Albany Medical College where he currently serves as a professor of neurology and the Riley Family Chair in Parkinson’s Disease. At Albany Medical Center, he completed his residency in neurology and a fellowship in movement disorders with Dr. Stewart Factor. He has served as the co-director of the Tardive Dyskinesia Clinic and Huntington’s Disease Comprehensive Care Center, as well as the course director of the 2nd year clinical neurosciences course at Albany Medical College. As an active member of the American Academy of Neurology and Movement Disorders Society, Parkinson Study Group, Huntington Study Group and Dystonia Study Group, Dr. Molho is undoubtedly a leader in his field uncovering medical breakthroughs and providing exceptional patient care.


September 14,2017 – meeting notice- Mary Piel will talk about (and do some of) LSVT BIG

September 14, 2017

Join the CDPSG Support Group for the monthly meeting.

The Capital District Parkinson’s Support Group meets at 7 PM the second Thursday of most months at the Beverwyck Senior Center located at Krumkill Road, Slingerlands, New York.

When are our meetings?

There will be networking.  Patients, spouses, siblings, medical professionals/students, friends, and caregivers are welcome to attend to learn more about Parkinson’s disease or obtain information.

Topic

Mary Piel  will talk about (and do some of) LSVT BIG

She is an occupational therapist at Sunnyview Rehabilitation Hospital. She is certified in LSVT BIG which is a nationally recognized treatment for patient’s with Parkinson’s. Sunnyview has several therapist that are certified in LSVT BIG and they have also begun a Wellness Program for patient’s with Parkinson’s.

Notes


November 9, 2017 – Meeting Notice

Join the Capital District Parkinson’s Support Group for the monthly meeting. on Thursday November 9, 2017 at 7 PM at the Beverwyck Senior Center located at 40 Autumn Dr, Slingerlands, NY 12159

The Capital District Parkinson’s Support Group meets at 7 PM the second Thursday of most months. See www.cdparkinsons.org for directions and more information.

Patients, spouses, family members, medical professionals/students, friends, and caregivers are welcome to attend to learn more about Parkinson’s disease or obtain information.

 Topic : “Rap session:” open discussion about living with PD.

July 13, 2017 – meeting Cancelled

July 13, 2017  Meeting Cancelled

Join the CDPSG Support Group for the monthly meeting.

The Capital District Parkinson’s Support Group meets at 7 PM the second Thursday of every month at the Beverwyck Senior Center located at Krumkill Road, Slingerlands, New York.  No meetings in January and February.

There will be networking.  Patients, spouses, siblings, medical professionals/students, friends, and caregivers are welcome to attend to learn more about Parkinson’s disease or obtain information.

Picnic

June 8, 2017 Beverwyck Meeting agenda


Join the CDPSG Support Group for our monthly meeting.

Karen Wood from PharmaCannis will speak about

Medical marijuana

The Capital District Parkinson’s Support Group meets at 7 PM the second Thursday of every month at the Beverwyck Senior Center located at Krumkill Road, Slingerlands, New York.  No meetings in January and February.

There will be networking.  Patients, spouses, siblings, medical professionals/students, friends, and caregivers are welcome to attend to learn more about Parkinson’s disease or obtain information.

Read about medical marijuana here

About Vishad Sukul, M.D.

Dr. Sukul is fellowship trained in functional neurosurgery for the treatment of complex neurological conditions such as chronic pain and movement disorders. He has a particular interest in deep brain stimulation for the treatment of essential tremor, dystonia, and Parkinson’s disease, and also performs spinal cord stimulation and other neuromodulation techniques for chronic pain. Additionally, he practices general cranial and spine neurosurgery.

Dr. Sukul completed his fellowship training in stereotactic, functional and epilepsy neurosurgery at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, TN, and his neurosurgery residency training at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia, PA. He received his medical degree from Rutgers New Jersey Medical School. t Albany Medical College.

Dr. Sukul is fellowship trained in functional neurosurgery for the treatment of complex neurological conditions such as chronic pain and movement disorders. He has a particular interest in deep brain stimulation for the treatment of essential tremor, dystonia, and Parkinson’s disease, and also performs spinal cord stimulation and other neuromodulation techniques for chronic pain. Additionally, he practices general cranial and spine neurosurgery.

Dr. Sukul completed his fellowship training in stereotactic, functional and epilepsy neurosurgery at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, TN, and his neurosurgery residency training at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia, PA. He received his medical degree from Rutgers New Jersey Medical School. He is active in clinical research.